Boats

Catalina 355

by Charles J. Doane, Posted December 30, 2010
Catalina’s 445, introduced in 2009, won multiple awards and attracted much interest from buyers. According to Catalina VP and design maven Gerry Douglas, the only complaint some potential buyers had was that the boat was a bit bigger than what they needed or could afford. Hence the straightforward design brief for Douglas’s new boat, the 355, introduced at the 2010 Annapolis boat show: scale down

The Marblehead 22

by Adam Cort, Posted July 28, 2011
In his book Wind, Sand and Stars, famed French pilot Antoine de Saint-Expry wrote, “A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Fair enough. But while this may be true of airplanes, in the world of naval architecture, there are aesthetic considerations as well.

Moody 45DS

by Bill Springer, Posted March 28, 2012
Moody Yachts were built in Swanwick, England, on the banks of the Hamble River from the middle of the 18th century into the early years of the 21st, and Bill Dixon has been designing Moody’s cruising boats since 1981.

Bavaria Cruiser 36

by Adam Cort, Posted June 21, 2012
It’s funny how quickly things that once seemed revolutionary can become the norm. Created by Farr Yacht Design and BMW Group DesignworksUSA, the Bavaria Cruiser 36 comes standard with an in-mast furling main, fixed hull ports to help light the interior and a sturdy drop-down swim transom.
I have always admired Passport Yachts for their beauty, performance and detailing, but stepping aboard the new Passport Vista 545 CC, SAIL’s 2012 Best Boat in the Flagship Monohull category, I felt an especially strong sense of déja vu.

Hanse 415

by Bill Springer, Posted May 6, 2013
The Hanse 415 is superficially like a lot of new production cruising boats in the 40-foot range. But as I found out during a test sail on Narragansett Bay last fall, not all 40-foot “performance cruisers” are created equal.
The concept of seakindliness has largely been lost to modern sailors—with the possible exception of the bluewater cruising community. The basic idea is that a boat’s motion through the water—its “feel,” so to speak—should be as comfortable as it is seaworthy. 

Feeling 44

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
The Feeling 44 is another offshore cruiser with gunkholing capability; its optional lifting keel reduces draft from 8 feet, 6 inches to 2 feet. Considerable fixed ballast is built into the bottom of the hull to enhance stability and provide a solid grounding plate. This cruiser is thin-water friendly—its shallow rudder provides positive control with the keel fully retracted. It's also

Wylie 43

by Sail Staff, Posted November 19, 2004
California-based designer Tom Wylie is known for his long, slender sleds with freestanding masts, so the configuration of the new Wylie 43 should come as no surprise. It's billed as an "ultralight downwind flyer" and is aimed at the section of the market that's looking for performance in a more-affordable 43-foot package. The hull is made of a cored carbon-fiber laminate; the 4,800-pound keel

Perry 57

by Sail Staff, Posted May 3, 2005
A market is often the mother of invention. According to Australian cruising-catamaran designer and builder Bryan Perry, "A number of people saw the Perry 43 and liked it. They said they wanted something bigger along the same lines." So he checked on what was already available and came up with the Perry 57 to scratch the itch of his potential customers. The resulting design is 57 feet long and
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