Boats

Landing School 20

by Sail Staff, Posted August 3, 2010
Little sister to the nippy Landing School 30 introduced last year by the Landing School in Maine, the LS-20 looks like a heap of fun. A vacuum-bagged, cored hull, retracting sprit, lifting T-keel, carbon-fiber mast and full-length cockpit make this a daysailer with a difference.For more information on the LS-20, click

Beneteau First 30

by Charles J. Doane, Posted August 5, 2010
Beneteau has done a good job in recent years burnishing its racecourse mojo with its new generation of “First” series racer-cruisers. The very first, some will recall, was the 30.

Prout 50SW

by Sail Staff, Posted December 9, 2010
The words sleek and fast aren’t normally associated with the Prout name. Words like “sturdy” and “well-finished” more typically come to mind. Nonetheless, the new Prout 50SW is very different from the—how to say this diplomatically—peculiarly English Prouts of the 1980s and 1990s. The signature mast-aft rig of those earlier boats, with their tiny mainsails and huge jibs, is long gone, as is the

The Hunter 18

by Charles J. Doane, Posted July 13, 2011
the new Hunter 18 replaces the Hunter 170, which for several years was a mainstay in Hunter’s line of small daysailers. Like the 170, the 18 can serve as both an easy-to-manage family daysailer and as a lively performance boat for those with more experience.   At a glance the two boats look quite similar, sporting open transoms, centerboards and small sprayhoods forward. On closer inspection,

Alerion Sport 33

by Charles Mason, Posted January 1, 2011
  When Garry Hoyt began thinking about a new 28-footer, he wanted to avoid the two things he felt were keeping sailors from spending more time on the water. The first was an overly complex sailplan. 

Knysna 480

by Andrew Burton, Posted May 21, 2011
"Substantial" was my first thought when I stepped aboard the Knysna 480 at the Miami International Boat Show. This South African-built catamaran is obviously meant for serious cruising. And so confirmed owners Susan and Tim Mahoney, who chose the Knysna based on the reputation of the builder and their respect for designer Angelo Lavranos. 

Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 439

by Adam Cort, Posted June 1, 2012
All too often, sail trials end up taking place in minimal wind. But that certainly wasn’t the case with the new Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 439. Two days after the 2012 Annapolis Sailboat Show, a cold front brought with it overcast skies and gusts of 20 knots and more out of the northeast—which was just fine with the 439.

VX One Design

by Andrew Burton, Posted June 25, 2012
On a crisp early-fall day, designer and builder Brian Bennett unfurled the self-tacking jib on the VX One Design prototype and we moved to the weather side, feet under the hiking straps, pulling the boat upright and effortlessly accelerating in the puffy northerly. Feedback from the mainsheet and the tiller told me to ease the main a bit. My first thought was, “Brian’s got it right with this design!”

Dufour 36P

by Andrew Burton, Posted December 17, 2013
Sporting a plumb stem and a slightly raked reverse transom, the Dufour 36P (“P” for performance) seems at first glance to be designed solely for speed: a notion that chines just above the waterline aft and a tall nine-tenths rig with swept-back spreaders do little to dispel.

Boat Review: Xp44

by Adam Cort, Posted October 3, 2014
X-Yachts has long been one of my favorite production boatbuilders, for the simple reason that the company consistently builds great boats, and the Xp44 is no exception. This is a company that never cuts corners. The result is a boat that looks great, feels good and sails well.
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