Boats

King 40

by Bill Springer, Posted April 15, 2008
The King 40 is designed to be a true dual-purpose cruiser/racer, effective at racing offshore and around the cans as well as comfortable enough for family cruising. The deck plan was developed to allow plenty of room for a racing crew, but there are also comfortable places to sit in cruising mode. The lead bulb/narrow chord keel and high-aspect rudder should combine to provide

Elan 410

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Since even cruising sailors see the benefit of a little extra speed, the people at Elan have taken a logical step with their restyled Performance series. The Elan 410 is touted to be quick (especially in light wind) and comfortable. To do that, a tall rig allows for maximum sail area when the wind is light, but is easily reefed when the wind gets into the high 20s. As with

Island Packet 460

by Sail Staff, Posted December 11, 2008
You’ve got to tip your cap to the folks at Island Packet. They know their market. If you’re looking for a lightweight, fin-keel cruising boat with a sporty feel and a big cockpit, there are many to choose from. But if you’re looking for a new solid, moderate-displacement, full-keel cruising boat that will look after you, chances are an Island Packet will be one of the few boats on your very short

Weta Trimaran

by Kimball Livingston, Posted July 7, 2009
The breeze was mild, but still it made an impression to see Dave Bernsten walk away from the tiller of his 14-foot trimaran, step to the bow, fiddle with an adjustment, then mosey back aft and resume his duties at the helm. The moment speaks to the value proposition of the Weta as stable and forgiving, a viable family playground that will crank out speed thrills when the

Hunter Edge

by Tom Dove, Posted August 17, 2009
Every sailor’s perfect boat would be big enough to accommodate the whole family in luxury, perhaps 80 feet or so, and would have a draft of one or two feet for easy gunkholing, an efficient sail plan, good stability and speed, and mechanical aids for handling lines. The mast would lower easily to get under bridges. Oh, yes. It would not cost too much, would be beautiful to

Landing School 20

by Sail Staff, Posted August 3, 2010
Little sister to the nippy Landing School 30 introduced last year by the Landing School in Maine, the LS-20 looks like a heap of fun. A vacuum-bagged, cored hull, retracting sprit, lifting T-keel, carbon-fiber mast and full-length cockpit make this a daysailer with a difference.For more information on the LS-20, click

Beneteau First 30

by Charles J. Doane, Posted August 5, 2010
Beneteau has done a good job in recent years burnishing its racecourse mojo with its new generation of “First” series racer-cruisers. The very first, some will recall, was the 30.

Prout 50SW

by Sail Staff, Posted December 9, 2010
The words sleek and fast aren’t normally associated with the Prout name. Words like “sturdy” and “well-finished” more typically come to mind. Nonetheless, the new Prout 50SW is very different from the—how to say this diplomatically—peculiarly English Prouts of the 1980s and 1990s. The signature mast-aft rig of those earlier boats, with their tiny mainsails and huge jibs, is long gone, as is the

The Hunter 18

by Charles J. Doane, Posted July 13, 2011
the new Hunter 18 replaces the Hunter 170, which for several years was a mainstay in Hunter’s line of small daysailers. Like the 170, the 18 can serve as both an easy-to-manage family daysailer and as a lively performance boat for those with more experience.   At a glance the two boats look quite similar, sporting open transoms, centerboards and small sprayhoods forward. On closer inspection,

Alerion Sport 33

by Charles Mason, Posted January 1, 2011
  When Garry Hoyt began thinking about a new 28-footer, he wanted to avoid the two things he felt were keeping sailors from spending more time on the water. The first was an overly complex sailplan. 
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