Boats

Leopard 44

by Andrew Burton, Posted May 21, 2011
The latest collaboration bet-ween builder Robertson and Caine and designers Morrelli & Melvin has upped the high standards set by the rest of the Leopard fleet. This new 44-footer should be popular with private owners. I suspect it will be equally popular with charterers as the Sunsail 444.
Shot from the largest and latest in Jeanneau's Sun Odyssey line, the 509, we bring you a stem-to-stern look at how the editors of SAIL complete a boat review. Follow Charles Doane on the 509 as you learn how we measure and make sense of a brand new sailboat.

Southerly 49

by Charles J. Doane, Posted June 24, 2012
The Southerly range of beachable swing-keel cruisers from Britain’s Northshore Yachts has been consistently represented in the United States now for a number of years, which is a good thing, as there are many cruising grounds here where shoal-draft capability is a great advantage. Every time I sail a Southerly, I come away impressed by the utility offered by their ballasted swing keels and by the high quality of their design and construction

Jeanneau 41DS

by Tom Dove, Posted March 4, 2013
The new 41DS marries a deck saloon layout with its raised living space amidships, large windows and private cabins forward and aft, to a proven hull with fine sailing qualities.

Sabre 386

by Charles J. Doane, Posted February 28, 2005
Since its founding by Roger Hewson more than 20 years ago, Sabre Yachts has excelled at building boats under 40 feet. The old Sabre 28 is certainly one of the best pocket cruisers ever marketed, and Hewson himself often asserted that the company's core boats were its 36-footers. I personally have always favored the Sabre 38, both the Mark I and Mark II models, built

Etap 37s

by Tom Dove, Posted August 23, 2004
After sailing two or three hundred boats, I thought there would be no utterly novel features for me to discover aboard the next one. I was mistaken. Boat designers are a creative lot, and when they're engineers as well, the result can be a vessel loaded with innovative features. The Belgian-built Etap 37 is just such a package of pleasant surprises. Or maybe I shouldn't be surprised; after all, a

The best of the rest

by Sail Staff, Posted February 4, 2003
Each of these boats deserves to be recognized for a specific feature, design, or construction technique that was particularly innovative and/or well executed.Island Packet 486's nav stationAny offshore navigator would love to call this nerve-center nav station home. There's room to mount every imaginable electronic gadget, the varnished teak chart table is big enough to unfold a

Delphia 40

by Sail Staff, Posted June 6, 2006
Built as a sturdy passagemaker capable of withstanding the harshest of Baltic Sea conditions, this 40-foot Polish import carries 841 square feet of sail area, has a displacement of 18,000 pounds, and is available with a shoal or deep keel (5 feet, 6 inches/7 feet, 1 inch). The interior features 6-foot, 8-inch headroom in the saloon, mahogany joinerwork, and a choice of three- or four-cabin

Oyster 525

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Yet another new Oyster is under way, and as usual the design emphasis is a balanced combination of performance, comfort, and solid construction.Designer Rob Humphreys has given the new yacht a larger cockpit than other designs in the size range. And like all Oysters, it is ergonomically designed for comfort. Belowdeck accommodations include a spacious saloon, three guest cabins, and an

Meter maids

by Craig Davis, Posted February 3, 2009
Most sailors know that 12-Meter yachts were sailed in America’s Cup competitions between 1958 and 1987. Less well known is the fact that the Meter rule also applies to a range of yachts of different sizes, all built to what is formally known as the International Rule. First established in 1906, the rule has survived more or less intact for over a century. Last July a
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