Boats

Dufour 34

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2004
All my days on the water should be as perfect as the day we took a Dufour 34 out for a spin after the Miami Boat Show. We caught the back end of a February cold front that produced steady 12-to-15-knot northerly winds, sunny skies, and comfortable temperatures. As we motored out of the marina, it was obvious that I couldn’t have scheduled this test any better. The smallest boat in the revamped,

Friendship 53

by Sail Staff, Posted January 16, 2006
When a client wanted to replicate the exact look and idea of the Friendship 40, but in a slightly larger version with two staterooms instead of one, designer Ted Fontaine began to draw—and a big sister to the Friendship 40 was born. The exteriors of the two boats are nearly identical, with clean decks and low-profile cabintops providing a full 360-degree line of sight for the helmsman. The 53’s

Harmony 42

by Sail Staff, Posted March 29, 2005
In spite of all the advances in boat-building techniques over the years, hull and deck layup on boats over 25 feet has always been a labor-intensive, hands-on process. SCRIMP, resin infusion, and vacuum bagging have gone a long way toward reducing harmful styrene emissions and providing superior resin saturation, but these layup techniques still depend heavily on skilled workers. When Olivier

Hunter 41DS

by Bill Springer, Posted July 11, 2005
Since Hunter Marine is constantly devising new ways of increasing and maximizing interior volume, it seems only natural that the Hunter 41DS takes advantage of a deck-saloon layout to achieve a more open and airy accommodations plan. The DS has large elevated windows for panoramic views and a whopping 6-foot, 10-inch headroom in the saloon. The standard two-cabin version has a master stateroom

Dehler 44

by Bill Springer, Posted September 6, 2006
The new Dehler 44 is one of the first two of five new Simonis Voogd–designed Dehlers on the drawing board to be launched between 2006 and 2009. It’s designed to be a performance cruiser with the focus on performance. Production got under way this summer only after extensive computer modeling was used to determine the optimum shape of the hull and appendages. It appears that the designers gave the

Reichel/Pugh 62

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
A very experienced bluewater cruiser commissioned this fast carbon/epoxy cruising yacht and believes that even with all unnecessary weight removed, the yacht will be comfortable and seaworthy. Lyman Morse is using pre-preg carbon and SCRIMP resin infusion to build the vessel. The design features a full range of onboard systems, including a complete hydraulic package for operating the sailhandling

Kernan 69

by Kimball Livingston, Posted October 5, 2006
On the West Coast the heyday of the 70-foot sleds is remembered fondly, with good reason. Thanks to their light weight, those old sleds were not hard to manage, they were medium-tech so cost per foot wasn’t sky high, and you could race one with nothing more than a bunch of good sailors; forget the posse of full-time gunslingers. But the sled craze peaked in the early 1990s and later the West

Catalina 320 MK II

by Tom Dove, Posted May 20, 2008
Catalina boats typically have long production runs, and Catalina is more likely to tweak and update a boat than to totally redesign it. After building 1,039 Catalina 320s since 1993, with few changes other than offering a shallower wing keel about halfway through the production run, the company decided it was time to bring this popular vessel solidly into the new century.The

Catana 50

by Tom Dove, Posted August 8, 2008
Catana is back, and with a vengeance. This builder of performance-oriented cruising catamarans foundered when the fin-de-sicle dot.com crash decimated its customer list. But the company reorganized and is again building these swift, dramatically styled yachts in its Catalonian factory. This new 50-footer is very different from the 52-footer Catana was building under the old regime. Hull and

Moxie 37

by Sail Staff, Posted January 23, 2009
I was excited to see the South Africa–built Moxie 37 Island Hopper maneuvering into position before the Annapolis Boat Show opened last fall. It was unlike any other medium-size (under 40 feet) cruising cat at the show, and it was the first Moxie to appear in the U.S. I jumped aboard as soon as they tied up to the dock. It has a recessed working area at the base of the mast that's reminiscent of
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