Boats

Few designs pack as much fun into 18 feet as the Hobie Mirage Tandem Island, a two-person pedal-or-paddle kayak that converts to a sail-powered trimaran by attaching a pair of akas and amas, and stepping a carbon-fiber mast. The roller-reefing loose-footed mainsail carries a generous amount of sailcloth up high and is supported by vertical battens. The boat’s robust rotomolded hull encourages

Hanse 78 Premium

by Sail Staff, Posted March 1, 2012
Who’d have thought, just a few years ago, that production boatbuilders would soon be edging closer to super-yacht territory? Falling just a shade short of 80 feet, this semi-custom yacht opens up a new market for the prolific German builder.

Hanse 355

by Duncan Kent, Posted May 18, 2011
Launched in late 2010, the Hanse 355 sports a T-keel that makes her stiff, stable and impressively quick. There are a number of interior choices available that allow you to customize the layout, with either two or three cabins and numerous upholstery options.

Catalina 385

by Charles J. Doane, Posted June 13, 2012
The Catalina 385 is third in a series of new boats that began in 2009 with the award-winning 445 model. The concept behind this “5” series of boats is fairly simple: marry the best aspects of modern mass-production cruising boat design and construction with a healthy streak of common sense and practicality.
It’s fitting that one of the most interesting big cruisers I’ve sailed in a long while came out of a small Florida yard that builds trailerable sailboats. No mass-production builder could have come up with the Seaward 46RK—it wouldn’t have got past the focus groups.

Fountaine Pajot Hélia 44

by Adam Cort, Posted February 19, 2013
Although multihull innovation at the racing end of the spectrum gets the lion’s share of the press, no less of a revolution in design has been taking place among cruising multihulls: case in point, French multihull builder Fountaine Pajot’s new Hélia 44, a boat that in its own way is as cutting-edge as a carbon fiber racer. 

Boat Review: Bavaria 33

by Adam Cort, Posted September 5, 2014
There are few better places to put a cruising boat through its paces than Antigua, and not just because of the sun and sand. Leave the harbor, and depending on the conditions, you can soon find yourself dealing with big winds and even bigger seas—

West Wight Potter 15/19

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
There is a reason why West Wight Potters have been in production for over 42 years. They may appear tiny compared to modern thin-water pocket cruisers, but their hard-chined hulls, simple sailplans, and economical accommodations are just as fun, safe, and effective as they were 40 years ago. Price: West Wight Potter 15, $7,395 (including sails, engine, and trailer, FOB Inglewood, CA);

Hunter 27

by Sail Staff, Posted August 10, 2005
Not so long ago, compact coastal cruisers usually provided cramped quarters and minimal comfort, but the new Hunter 27 is cut from an entirely different mold. It’s only 27 feet long, but its 6 feet, 2 inches of headroom and nearly 10 feet of beam provide enough internal volume for cruising amenities not often found on 27-foot boats. Being able to stand up down below is

Perini Navi 184

by Sail Staff, Posted January 16, 2006
Ron Holland and the Perini Navi in-house architectural team are working together on this latest project, which has a launch date of spring 2008. The aluminum yacht will have a 233-foot aluminum mast with carbon-fiber spreaders, a carbon boom with in-boom furling, plus 12 captive winches to handle its 31,000 square feet of sail area. The owner’s cabin will be spacious, extending across the
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