Boats

Lagoon 560

by Sail Staff, Posted March 11, 2011
The latest boat from the world’s largest catamaran builder replaces the long-in-the-tooth Lagoon 57 and joins the 500 and 620 in Lagoon’s revamped flagship line. And flagship is about right; you’d need an 80ft monohull to get anywhere near the space you’ll find on this big cruiser. The four-cabin/four-head layout is likely to be most popular, but there is also a five-cabin version. Lagoon’s

Hunter e36

by Adam Cort, Posted September 30, 2011
The Hunter e36 feels right from the moment you step aboard and is somehow more than the sum of its parts. In both appearance and functionality, it works well and is a pleasure to sail.   Construction The hull and deck on the e36 are standard for Hunter, with balsa coring above the waterline and solid fiberglass below. The layup includes a modified

Catalina 315

by Adam Cort, Posted April 23, 2012
Catalina Yachts is in many ways an anomaly—a mass-production boatbuilder that eschews design fads in a manner more typically associated with companies that produce far fewer boats at much higher prices. The result is a product line that is robust, reliable and easy on sailors.

TomCat 970S

by Tom Dove, Posted June 2, 2012
The debut of TomCat’s first 32-foot 970 catamaran, about eight years ago at the Annapolis Sailboat Show, was a pleasant surprise. Since then, the builders have continued to refine the boat, a process that has resulted in the new TomCat 970S.

BayRaider 20

by Peter Nielsen, Posted June 18, 2012
When SAIL’s judges were weighing the candidates for the 2012 Best Boats daysailer award, there was no dissension over the winner: the BayRaider 20 scored a unanimous thumbs-up for its blend of portability, performance, good looks, build quality and innovation.

Bavaria Vision 46

by Adam Cort, Posted December 3, 2013
According to Bavaria, the new Vision 46 is: “designed, from the start, to embody the cruising sailor’s wish list.” I have to admit, though, that I wasn’t paying too much attention to this wish list as we cast off lines prior to a recent delivery from Mystic, Connecticut.

Nautitech 542

by Adam Cort, Posted January 9, 2014
Like many monohull sailors, what first drew me to today’s cruising multihulls was all that lounging space. Performance concerns were secondary, at best. What was the point? Over the years, though, my standards have changed. No longer am I content sailing on a mere party platform.

Sabre 386

by Charles J. Doane, Posted February 28, 2005
Since its founding by Roger Hewson more than 20 years ago, Sabre Yachts has excelled at building boats under 40 feet. The old Sabre 28 is certainly one of the best pocket cruisers ever marketed, and Hewson himself often asserted that the company's core boats were its 36-footers. I personally have always favored the Sabre 38, both the Mark I and Mark II models, built

Etap 37s

by Tom Dove, Posted August 23, 2004
After sailing two or three hundred boats, I thought there would be no utterly novel features for me to discover aboard the next one. I was mistaken. Boat designers are a creative lot, and when they're engineers as well, the result can be a vessel loaded with innovative features. The Belgian-built Etap 37 is just such a package of pleasant surprises. Or maybe I shouldn't be surprised; after all, a

The best of the rest

by Sail Staff, Posted February 4, 2003
Each of these boats deserves to be recognized for a specific feature, design, or construction technique that was particularly innovative and/or well executed.Island Packet 486's nav stationAny offshore navigator would love to call this nerve-center nav station home. There's room to mount every imaginable electronic gadget, the varnished teak chart table is big enough to unfold a
  • facebook
  • twitter