Profiles

The prospect of sailing 4,500 miles across the South Pacific on a 48-foot sailboat with two small children and a wife prone to seasickness is enough to make most sane skippers back away in terror. Lucky for me, my not-so-sane husband saw it as the chance of a lifetime. So in May of 2008, we cast off from Honolulu aboard our Swan 48, Sundance, with our two children, Sofia Maria, 5, and Rufo, 4, and threw ourselves to the wind.
Rather than junior sailing lessons, David Tunick, 68, of New York City, learned sailing by “on-the-job” experience. While his family drove powerboats, he and a friend bought a Lightning in 1966 and started “sleeping-bag cruising.”
SAIL Magazine's Editor Peter Nielsen offers an opinion on the matter of compulsory lifejacket use...

Pipe Dreams

by David Schmidt, Posted September 23, 2009
When William "Scott" Piper III was a child his father laid a piece of advice on him that still resonates after 60-plus years: "There’s no reason to live in Florida if you don’t do what it has to offer." With this, a passion for sailing was born, and with it a legacy that Piper’s father, now passed, would be proud of: Four "near" circumnavigations, podium finishes in high-profile events such as
Is it the dandelions he regularly eats, or the well water he drinks at home in Port Clinton, Ohio? Whatever it is, it’s working for Tom Corogan, who at the age of 84 is making his sixth attempt to round Cape Horn—solo  
Liz Clark, 32, longtime sailor and surfer, spent the last six years fulfilling her lifelong dream of sailing around the world, or just about. While Clark didn’t make it all the way around, she navigated most of the South Pacific Ocean solo on board her Cal 40 Swell.

Five Families Prove that Sailing is a Family Affair

by Contributing Writers, Posted August 4, 2014
Whether it’s racing with dad, weekending with a baby or circumnavigating with the whole tribe, these five families are proving that sailing brings them together
In a classroom on Captiva Island in Florida, six students gather around a white board and watch their instructor draw a diagram of the points of sail. The students range in age from 30 to 70 and hail from Ireland, South Africa, Texas and New York. As their minds take in the new information, a door opens behind them. “Hi, we’re Steve and Doris Colgate!” says a grinning Doris. “Just stopping by to
While the majority of bluewater cruisers take to the seas kid-free, there are a brave few who manage to raise a family while cruising. It’s not a well-worn path, but teenage cruisers Gina and Fransisco Rowe wouldn’t think of following another.  

In Search of an Iceberg

by Maura Flaherty, Posted February 20, 2013
Teresa Carey and her husband, Ben, plan to release their documentary film, One Simple Question, to film festivals this summer. The film follows the couple as they move aboard their Bristol Channel Cutter 28 Elizabeth and set sail in search of a mammoth iceberg adrift in the North Atlantic. 
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