Profiles

Sailing Sense: The Quiet Stranger

by Robbert Das, Posted June 17, 2011
Originally published in the February 2009 issueNo one really knows what inspired Harry Young, a 38-year-old British sailor who’d been staying in New York, to sail solo across the Atlantic. It’s also not clear why he made the passage in a small boat he’d designed and built himself and hadn’t bothered to name, though some think Young had been up to some mischief in New York and
Henry “Hank” Strauss, still tack-sharp at 97, had to give up sailing solo a few years back but still regularly gets out on San Francisco Bay with friends. His lifetime in sailing spans the evolution of cruising under sail as we know it. 
Chris White, when I first meet him, doesn’t seem like a guy who maybe, just maybe, is on the verge of revolutionizing multihull rig design. I’ve met a lot of yacht designers over the years, and I know that’s what many of them would be telling me right now, flat out, without any maybes. But not Chris.

SAIL Magazine Rewind: Little Jonah and the Hurricane

by Douglas Jones, Posted September 21, 2011
This story was originally published in the August 1995 issue of
When Justin Scott wrote The Shipkiller in 1978, it made the New York Times Book Review list and earned a spot on the International Thriller Writers list, Thrillers: 100 Best Reads, alongside The Odyssey, The Bourne Identity and The Hunt for Red October. TIME magazine wrote, “The saga…is as heady as Francis Chichester’s narrative, with a draught of Melville and a slosh of Josh Slocum.”

Air and Water

by Adam Cort, Posted October 31, 2011
Most sailors only go aloft when necessary—either to do some kind of repair or maybe to get a better view while picking their way into a strange harbor. For French sailors Franck Rabilier and Delphine Lechifflart, though, messing about in their boat’s rigging is the most natural thing in the world. Currently partway through a circumnavigation, the two acrobats have staged dozens of performances at
Growing up in a distinguished sailing family has its advantages, but as Sheila McCurdy discovered, nothing trumps experience. Her late father, Jim McCurdy (of McCurdy & Rhodes Naval Architects), loved racing, but mainly sailed offshore with clients until he designed Selkie, the family’s 38-foot sloop, in 1986.
These 11 small-boat sailors share their stories to prove that bigger isn't always better, especially when it comes to sailing

A Mermaid Muse

by Sarah Eberspacher, Posted October 31, 2011
The sailors of old may have filled their free time with activities like scrimshaw and fancy knot work. But during a recent yearlong cruise with her family, 8-year-old Emily Ehlers (now 12) stayed busy creating a new card game, which is now being marketed under the name “Mermaid Beach.”   A native of Portland, Oregon, Emily, her parents and two brothers sailed their 42-foot Pearson 424,
Ned Cabot recently died in a tragic accident aboard Cielita along the coast of Newfoundland. The following interview took place in May. 
  • facebook
  • twitter