Profiles

He was more tentative going forward on deck and his sore shoulder made getting out of the dinghy awkward. Would this be his last summer on the boat, especially now that he’s 15?
Stanley Aaron Dashew couldn't wait to show off his boat. The careful engineering. The attention to detail. It was all ready for some long-distance voyaging, but, frankly, he’ll never get to do that again, because at this point he can't walk, and he can't talk. 

Sailing in Home Waters

by Contributing Writers, Posted August 26, 2014
Admit it: there’s something unbeatable about sailing in your home waters. You know every tidal pattern, every obscured rock and every fluky habit of the wind. You could navigate with your eyes closed, though you’d never close your eyes, for fear of missing out on the scenery.
The best piece of boat-buying advice I received was this: buy the boat that suits your present needs, not the boat you dream you will need. We keep our big-boat desires in check by chartering in the Caribbean and New Zealand, but a trailer-sailer suits most of my needs.

Pipe Dreams

by David Schmidt, Posted September 23, 2009
When William "Scott" Piper III was a child his father laid a piece of advice on him that still resonates after 60-plus years: "There’s no reason to live in Florida if you don’t do what it has to offer." With this, a passion for sailing was born, and with it a legacy that Piper’s father, now passed, would be proud of: Four "near" circumnavigations, podium finishes in high-profile events such as
Is it the dandelions he regularly eats, or the well water he drinks at home in Port Clinton, Ohio? Whatever it is, it’s working for Tom Corogan, who at the age of 84 is making his sixth attempt to round Cape Horn—solo  
Liz Clark, 32, longtime sailor and surfer, spent the last six years fulfilling her lifelong dream of sailing around the world, or just about. While Clark didn’t make it all the way around, she navigated most of the South Pacific Ocean solo on board her Cal 40 Swell.

Five Families Prove that Sailing is a Family Affair

by Contributing Writers, Posted August 4, 2014
Whether it’s racing with dad, weekending with a baby or circumnavigating with the whole tribe, these five families are proving that sailing brings them together
In a classroom on Captiva Island in Florida, six students gather around a white board and watch their instructor draw a diagram of the points of sail. The students range in age from 30 to 70 and hail from Ireland, South Africa, Texas and New York. As their minds take in the new information, a door opens behind them. “Hi, we’re Steve and Doris Colgate!” says a grinning Doris. “Just stopping by to
While the majority of bluewater cruisers take to the seas kid-free, there are a brave few who manage to raise a family while cruising. It’s not a well-worn path, but teenage cruisers Gina and Fransisco Rowe wouldn’t think of following another.  
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