Profiles

He was more tentative going forward on deck and his sore shoulder made getting out of the dinghy awkward. Would this be his last summer on the boat, especially now that he’s 15?
Stanley Aaron Dashew couldn't wait to show off his boat. The careful engineering. The attention to detail. It was all ready for some long-distance voyaging, but, frankly, he’ll never get to do that again, because at this point he can't walk, and he can't talk. 

Sailing in Home Waters

by Contributing Writers, Posted August 26, 2014
Admit it: there’s something unbeatable about sailing in your home waters. You know every tidal pattern, every obscured rock and every fluky habit of the wind. You could navigate with your eyes closed, though you’d never close your eyes, for fear of missing out on the scenery.
The best piece of boat-buying advice I received was this: buy the boat that suits your present needs, not the boat you dream you will need. We keep our big-boat desires in check by chartering in the Caribbean and New Zealand, but a trailer-sailer suits most of my needs.

The Top Community Sailing Centers of 2011

by Meghan Dente, Posted November 6, 2011
Out of 500 organizations, nine were chosen as US Sailing's Top Community Sailing Centers of 2011. Here's a look at the winners.
Betty Nissen had a dream for a life at sea. Sixty years ago, she and her husband, John, co-founded what is now the largest organization for voyaging cruisers in the world.
“This life is so incredibly rich with memories,” says SAILFeed blogger Behan Gifford, who has been cruising with her family for five years.

Cruising for a Cause

by Meredith Laitos, Posted February 27, 2009
One of the great things about sailing is that no two sailors have to set out for the same purpose. Some sail for the love of speed. Some sail for the love of gadgetry. Some, to be with friends and family. To see new sights. For intensity. For tranquility. For Columbus it was exploration. For Desjoyeaux it is competition. But for the crew of Khulula and Can Drac, it’s about
The ARC, which starts each November in the Canary Islands, is very much a European event and the Americans who run it are often a bit out of the ordinary. Without doubt, the least ordinary American boat in this last edition of the rally was the Gunboat 66 Phaedo.
Sailing has always been a priority for Elsie Hulsizer, 66, of Seattle, Washington. Her love affair with Northwest sailing was launched when she was 12 and her father built an 18-foot Robert’s Knockabout.
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