Caribbean Racing

Dream Week

by Sail Staff, Posted October 22, 2008
“You gotta be kidding me!” exclaims a muscle-bound member of the crew of Leopard, a brand-new Farr-designed, British-owned 100-foot Super-Maxi, from our observation post aboard her tender. “The RC’s set the finishing line just off that reef. Leopard’s doing 15 knots, easy. There’s not much time to gybe, get that kite down, and head up.” Seated around me are other
Like many international sailing events, this spring’s Antigua Sailing Week found itself having to cope with the eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajkull volcano, the bareboat fleet in particular taking a serious hit.“The Icelandic volcano probably lost us 15 to 20 boats,” said regatta director Neil Forrester. “Flights out of Europe were closed just at a time when a lot of charter guests were

North of Twenty

by David Schmidt, Posted October 22, 2008
“This thing is like a Volvo Open 70 except it doesn’t have a canting keel and its systems are more refined,” says veteran bowman Jerry Kirby as Numbers, Dan Meyers’s newly splashed Judel/Vrolijk 66, hits a big wave and jostles the crew, most of whom are stationed near the stern to keep the bow up. All around us are choppy seas; the true-wind instrument reads 18 to 21 knots, and our
This year marks the 25th anniversary of the ultra-chic Bucket Regatta series, which began on Nantucket Island in 1986 and has since moved to Newport, Rhode Island, and the island of St. Barthelemy. The first Bucket was an informal affair, with seven boats competing over a 15-mile course. Since then, the Bucket has grown tremendously and has become the event for megayachts,

Blast Reaching

by David Schmidt, Posted December 19, 2008
I admit that I was skeptical about racing on a big catamaran for a day at Antigua Sailing Week. My previous cat experience was limited, and I wasn’t expecting much. I’d seen the fleet of exotic-looking Gunboats—three GB48s and three GB62s—dockside on day one of this annual regatta. With their synthetic-fiber halyards strung from Marstrom carbon-fiber rigs and their chisel-like bows practically

Pacific Pearl

by Wally Moran, Posted March 23, 2011
Polynesian tradition has it that if you throw flower petals into the sea and they return to you, you will return to the islands.I was in French Polynesia for the Tahiti Pearl Regatta, regarded by many as one of sailing’s premire regattas after only seven years in existence. I am pleased to report that many are very likely right.My host for the regatta was Tahiti Tourisme, and true
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