Caribbean Racing

Blast Reaching

by David Schmidt, Posted December 19, 2008
I admit that I was skeptical about racing on a big catamaran for a day at Antigua Sailing Week. My previous cat experience was limited, and I wasn’t expecting much. I’d seen the fleet of exotic-looking Gunboats—three GB48s and three GB62s—dockside on day one of this annual regatta. With their synthetic-fiber halyards strung from Marstrom carbon-fiber rigs and their chisel-like bows practically

Pacific Pearl

by Wally Moran, Posted March 23, 2011
Polynesian tradition has it that if you throw flower petals into the sea and they return to you, you will return to the islands.I was in French Polynesia for the Tahiti Pearl Regatta, regarded by many as one of sailing’s premire regattas after only seven years in existence. I am pleased to report that many are very likely right.My host for the regatta was Tahiti Tourisme, and true

Caribbean Class

by Kimball Livingston, Posted January 20, 2009
How do you spot a happy European sailor?The Caribbean tan.How do you spot a happy American sailor?Surely you have my drift.When it’s overcoat weather in St. Tropez or Green Bay, it’s time for Martinique. St. Barts. St. Lucia. Key West. Any place from Florida south. And if you’re looking to race, no problem. The 7,000 isles, reefs, and cays of the
On March 25-27, the St. Thomas Rolex Regatta marked its 38th anniversary with three days that represented the very best in Caribbean racing. Steady breezes building from 12 knots to the high teens throughout the event, sunny afternoons, a varied and highly competitive fleet, excellent race committee work and parties that were neither too big nor too small, but just right: it
We arrived in Tortola determined, if not to win the cruising class, to at least have a creditable go in the annual BVI Spring Regatta with the all woman crew of “Team SAIL”. We looked damned good in our pink team shirts and matching pink Crocs and were sure to look equally good on the water aboard the Moorings 51.5 charterboat, Caribbean Soul. And if we failed…at least we escaped a cold
Having now celebrated its 40th year, the BVI Spring Regatta may officially be classified as “middle aged,” but it hardly shows any signs of slowing down.On March 28-April 3, an impressive 122 boats descended on Tortola’s Nanny Cay for five days of what sailors have long come to expect from this event—sun, wind, high-octane competition and even higher-octane parties.As

Bahamas Sloop Winds

by Sail Staff, Posted February 5, 2009
Northeast trades: 25 knots, gusting 30. The quarter-wake hissing.My 29-year-old son, Noah, and I had just shaken out the reef in the mainsail on our little Bahamas sloop and fallen off onto a reach in the lee of Great Guana Cay when we saw the old salt.Screaming out of the settlement’s harbor, he held the tiller of a sky-blue sailing skiff with a casual at-homeness I have seen only
A varied fleet sailed the fourth-annual RORC Caribbean 600 in perfect conditions. The largest boat was line-honors winner Hetairos, a 141-foot Baltic ketch drawing 30 feet with her drop-keel fully extended.

HIHO regatta

by Ryan Jolley, Posted March 9, 2009
"Take your time, nice and slow," said our captain ever time anybody stepped on the dinghy, and it soon became the motto of Bonac Witch, a Moorings 4300 catamaran that served as one of the spectator boats for the 24th annual Highland Spring HIHO Regatta in the British Virgin Islands. For my girlfriend, Taylor, and me, taking it nice and slow was exactly what we
We were maybe half a mile from the leeward mark, surging along relentlessly aboard the X-65 Karuba V, when the rig came down to the accompaniment of a collective gasp from the crew. Thankfully, it wasn’t our rig—but we did feel sorry for the guys on Highland Fling XII, Irvine Laidlaw’s spanking new Reichel-Pugh IRC 52.
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