Everything Else

The Color of Safety

by Sail Staff, Posted August 9, 2010
After years of manufacturing orange liferafts, Viking Life-Saving Equipment is now making its rafts fluorescent yellow. Viking made the switch after extensive testing showed that yellow shows up better against the grays and blues of the ocean, as well as in fog. Viking has incorporated the color into its upgraded RescYou line of rafts, which also features a blue inner lining that is said to have

Sliced and Diced

by Sail Staff, Posted September 16, 2007
Besides nationality, what do the Swiss America’s Cup syndicate Alinghi and knife manufacturer Wenger have in common? Answer: A partnership that has produced a well-thought-out, sailing-specific knife. The Alinghi Knife features the best pliers I’ve ever seen on a folding knife, a locking blade, a line gauge, various screwdrivers, and a spike—all designed to help you MacGyver yourself out of tight

Rub-A-Dub-Dub

by Adam Cort, Posted July 6, 2011
Here’s incontrovertible proof that today’s sailors have it easier than their forebears. The TugTub is a portable floating hot tub that takes just five minutes to deploy and an hour to heat to 104 degrees, providing even the lowliest weekend cruiser with an amenity worthy of a megayacht. Larry Ellison, eat your heart out! The tubs can be used in fresh and salt water, and employ an 88,000BTU LPG

Get a Grip on Your Winch Handles

by Sail Staff, Posted August 20, 2012
While it’s true that just about any winch handle will turn a winch, that’s no reason not to think carefully when purchasing one. Selecting the right handle for a particular boat or application will make not only make your sailing more efficient but more enjoyable as well.

Pocket Sword

by David Schmidt, Posted July 7, 2008
Pocket SwordIf you like folding knives with a million built-in gadgets, stop reading this review. But if you value exceptional workmanship, excellent quality materials, and the sharpest blade that this sailor has ever used — bar none — meet the Basic 3 from the studio of boutique knife maker David Boye. After using countless stainless-steel diving knives that always end

Shackle Dog

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005
The Shackle Dog—so called because its inventor thought it resembled the family pooch—is a simple piece of anodized aluminum. You can’t open bottles with it or use it as a screwdriver. You can only open or close shackles. But it does that simple job very well, and, at $4.95, there’s no reason to be without one. Shackle Dog; 203-312-0071;

Swing Time

by Sail Staff, Posted September 16, 2007
Nothing beats lounging in a hammock with a good book after a sail. Cool Net Hammocks recently introduced its namesake product, which is easily set up via a three-point connection system. The hammock can be attached either forward of the mast (attaching to the forestay, the mast, and a shroud) or behind it (using a shroud, the mast, and the backstay), depending on your boat’s layout. The hammocks

Unbreakable "Class"

by Adam Cort, Posted August 23, 2011
Newly arrived from Australia, the Palm line of unbreakable polycarbonate “glasses” makes it possible to enjoy a drink aboard with a touch of class—and no worries about something breaking. Each glass—whether it’s a champagne flute or a high ball—has a soft, sticky nonskid base, which also helps lower the center of gravity. Stems are available in white or blue, and the glasses are both stackable

Robship's Hook & Moor

by Adam Cort, Posted March 15, 2013
Robship’s Hook & Moor uses a rotating, bearing-driven “hook” to reliably thread a line with a loop on the end through a ring or cleat with a simple pull or push.

Everything In Place

by Connie McBride, Posted August 21, 2008
Aboard our 34-foot Creekmore–designed sloop, Eurisko, we use easy-to-reach Sunbrella pockets to store our binoculars and hand-bearing compass. Cruising with three teenage boys has taught us that pockets, and lots of them, also make terrific storage containers for them. I've made pockets for both bunks in the aft cabin; 24 pockets cover the entire space from the bunk up to the bottom of the
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