Boatworks

Bilge Bypass

by Sail Staff, Posted June 19, 2009
Being able to convert your engine’s raw-water intake into an emergency bilge pump is an important safety feature. A discussion on the subject that appeared in SAIL (March 2009) suggested closing the raw-water seacock first, disconnecting the intake hose from the seacock, and attaching an extension hose long enough to reach the bilge. This may work, but in my experience, when

Switched On

by Sail Staff, Posted January 9, 2006
A boat’s engine-cranking and domestic batteries are on separate circuits so that the starting battery isn’t accidentally drained, but you need to be able to combine the power from both batteries to help start a reluctant engine. Usually this means installing either three single switches or a four-position (off, 1, 2, both) selector switch; either way, it’s all too easy to leave the switch in the

Shock Absorbed

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2007
Aronowitsch and Lyth AB’s Bungy device provides a simple way to moor and anchor your boat safely and can help tame gybes, too. Simply snap a few Bungys onto your anchor gear and you’re done. When storms hit, Bungys add shock-absorbing stretch to your mooring pennant or anchor rode; each Bungy is designed to regain its shape, without loss of strength, once the force on the lines subsides. Bungys

Compact Fuel Polisher

by Adam Cort, Posted February 14, 2012
KTI Systems has introduced a new line of compact FilterBoss fuel polishing modules (FPM) designed to fit into tight engine compartments and other small onboard spaces.

Cadium-free Anodes

by Adam Cort, Posted October 15, 2012
You can protect the environment while protecting your propeller and shaft from electrochemical corrosion by swapping out your traditional zincs—which contain small amounts of highly toxic cadmium—with cadmium-free aluminum...
Silent Running SR1000 is a nontoxic water-based vibration-absorbing material that you brush, spray or roll on like paint. It works by converting noise and vibration into low-grade heat, which is then dissipated throughout the surface on which it’s been applied.
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