Sails+Rigging

Ronstan’s new Quick-Lock winch handles have a proprietary “auto quick-locking mechanism” that allows you to immediately place the drive head of the handle into a winch socket without first rotating a knob or pushing a button. The handle’s stainless steel locking lever automatically holds the handle in place—no more wasting time lining up buttons in the middle of a tack or gybe.

Easy Options

by Sail Staff, Posted February 6, 2009
Here’s good news for foredeck crews who have to deal with hectic sail changes and less-than-ideal sheeting angles. Harken’s new high-load snatch blocks feature an innovative soft-strop attachment system that makes life easy. The blocks currently come in four sizes (safe working loads of 5,070 pounds, 10,805 pounds, 18,080, and 26,460 pounds), and should work well in such static-line applications

Power at the Push of a Button

by Sail Staff, Posted March 9, 2006
Labor-saving devices like headsail and mainsail furlers and powered anchor windlasses have become commonplace on sailboats as small as 30 feet, so it’s not surprising that the quest for an easier life is extending even further. Powered sheet winches have long been the rage on cruising boats of 50 feet and up, but this technology too has filtered downward. Lewmar’s L34 lays claim to being the

Don't Forget-Me-Knots

by Adam Cort, Posted July 28, 2011
A knowledge of knots, bends and hatches is central to good seamanship, and while it’s true that in the vast majority of cases a limited number of them will suffice, we could all probably stand to know a few more. For me, the kicker is the anchor bend. It’s a great way to attach a line to a shackle, but I rarely use it and can never seem to retrieve it correctly from my cerebral database on those
Johnson Marine’s splice line fittings allow you to easily and reliably splice Dyneema or Spectra line onto a variety of different lifeline terminals when swapping out high-modulus line for stainless steel wire lifelines. The fittings are machined from 6061-T6 aluminum and are anodized to ensure long service life.

Trim On!

by David Schmidt, Posted March 10, 2009
As with many Harken products, the secret to the outstanding performance behind the SpeedGrip handles are ball bearings. As with blocks, the ball bearings inside the SpeedGrip handles allow for virtually frictionless movement, which is a sure-fire recipe for translating as much of your brawn into sheeting action as possible. Harken SpeedGrip winches feature ball bearings for both the vertical

A Sail for Riding

by Sail Staff, Posted April 9, 2006
Most boats don’t behave as well when anchored with rope rode as they do when lying to chain. They tend to sheer about much more, especially in wind-against-tide scenarios, which is bad for your nerves—and those of your neighbors. One way of coping with this is to set a riding sail on the backstay to help keep the bow pointed into the wind. You could make one of these yourself, or you could order

Trim Like a Megayacht

by Adam Cort, Posted August 23, 2011
Cruisers with boats in the 50-60ft range can now enjoy push-button mainsheet trimming, thanks to this Touch Trim system from Harken. With Touch Trim, the mainsheet is no longer in the cockpit, but is self-contained in the boom, where it is controlled by an electric motor turning a ball screw.Two different models are available to accommodate in-mast reefing or a standard mainsail. The

Jurgon Tool-Free Clevis

by Adam Cort, Posted August 27, 2013
The Jurgan Tool-Free clevis is just that: a clevis pin with a proprietary mechanism that allows it to be secured without the need to thread or bend a cotter pin. 

ATN Genoa Sleeve

by David Schmidt, Posted April 14, 2009
If you have a roller-furling headsail, the ATN Genoa Sleeve is worth your attention. It’s built of abrasion-resistant, UV-proof material and protects your headsail (racing or cruising) without adding weight to the sail or requiring that it be altered. The sleeve is hoisted on a spare halyard and is laced with adjustable thin-diameter cordage that holds the sleeve snug to the sail when tightened,
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