Sails+Rigging

Few sailors look forward to climbing the mast, but inevitably there comes a time when it’s necessary to make repairs aloft. Bosun’s chairs are the method of choice, but you need...

Spun!

by Sail Staff, Posted September 10, 2008
By David SchmidtSeldn Masts, Inc., has a new line of deck hardware to complement its already extensive line of spars. The line currently includes a line of plane-bearing blocks, auto-ratchet blocks, ball-bearing blocks, wire blocks (for adjustable backstays), and cam cleats (some of which are swivel mounted), but Selden plans to expand into genoa tracks and cars, as well as traveler cars

Furler with a Box

by Sail Staff, Posted March 9, 2006
Facnor says that lessons it has learned installing custom gear on top ocean-racing boats have been applied to its new headsail furlers for boats from 20 to 90 feet. The LX has a “bearing box” at the drum and head swivels, each containing two polymer bearings that reportedly spread loads evenly. A rotating tack fitting allows the furler drum and head to turn before the twin-groove luff extrusion,

Wheel Extension

by Adam Cort, Posted July 28, 2011
From the office of “Why didn’t I think of that?” comes Forespar’s new quick-release Steering Control Arm, which is basically a tiller extension for a wheel. The arm has a twist-lock extension, like those found on many boathooks, and a quick-release clamp, so it can be attached or detached from a wheel in seconds. As with a tiller extension, the Steering Control Arm allows you to steer from
Ronstan’s new Quick-Lock winch handles have a proprietary “auto quick-locking mechanism” that allows you to immediately place the drive head of the handle into a winch socket without first rotating a knob or pushing a button. The handle’s stainless steel locking lever automatically holds the handle in place—no more wasting time lining up buttons in the middle of a tack or gybe.

Easy Options

by Sail Staff, Posted February 6, 2009
Here’s good news for foredeck crews who have to deal with hectic sail changes and less-than-ideal sheeting angles. Harken’s new high-load snatch blocks feature an innovative soft-strop attachment system that makes life easy. The blocks currently come in four sizes (safe working loads of 5,070 pounds, 10,805 pounds, 18,080, and 26,460 pounds), and should work well in such static-line applications

Power at the Push of a Button

by Sail Staff, Posted March 9, 2006
Labor-saving devices like headsail and mainsail furlers and powered anchor windlasses have become commonplace on sailboats as small as 30 feet, so it’s not surprising that the quest for an easier life is extending even further. Powered sheet winches have long been the rage on cruising boats of 50 feet and up, but this technology too has filtered downward. Lewmar’s L34 lays claim to being the

Don't Forget-Me-Knots

by Adam Cort, Posted July 28, 2011
A knowledge of knots, bends and hatches is central to good seamanship, and while it’s true that in the vast majority of cases a limited number of them will suffice, we could all probably stand to know a few more. For me, the kicker is the anchor bend. It’s a great way to attach a line to a shackle, but I rarely use it and can never seem to retrieve it correctly from my cerebral database on those
Johnson Marine’s splice line fittings allow you to easily and reliably splice Dyneema or Spectra line onto a variety of different lifeline terminals when swapping out high-modulus line for stainless steel wire lifelines. The fittings are machined from 6061-T6 aluminum and are anodized to ensure long service life.

Trim On!

by David Schmidt, Posted March 10, 2009
As with many Harken products, the secret to the outstanding performance behind the SpeedGrip handles are ball bearings. As with blocks, the ball bearings inside the SpeedGrip handles allow for virtually frictionless movement, which is a sure-fire recipe for translating as much of your brawn into sheeting action as possible. Harken SpeedGrip winches feature ball bearings for both the vertical
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