Books+Media

In 1983, Dodge Morgan, then 53, sold his electronics company and made a promise to himself: he would sail around the world, alone, without stopping. He hoped to complete the 27,459-nautical-mile voyage onboard his 60-foot cutter, American Promise, in 220 days. That would require him to sail 100 miles a day at an average speed of 6.25 knots. As Morgan boarded American Promise in
Until recently, when melting ice began opening up the Northwest Passage to more sailors, it was largely considered the “Arctic Grail” of high-latitude cruising.

River in the Sea

by Steve Henkind, Posted November 20, 2008
The Gulf Stream: Tiny Plankton, Giant Bluefin, and the Amazing Story of the Powerful River in the AtlanticWhat do Portuguese men-of-war, pirates, Benjamin Franklin, and Ernest Hemingway have in common? They are all closely associated with the Gulf Stream.In this wonderful book, Stan Ulanski ties together many facets of this great river in the sea, including its

Small Boat, Big Adventure

by Sail Staff, Posted January 12, 2010
"Going places in your own sailboat is one of the greatest travel experiences you can have. And you don't need to go all the way to French Polynesia to experience the thrill of discovery that sailing offers. Simply exploring secluded coves in an inland lake can be an adventure that you and your family will never forget," writes Brian Gilbert in his new book The Complete Trailer

Bull Canyon

by Sarah Eberspacher, Posted July 6, 2011
Lin and Larry Pardey have long been fixtures in the sailing world, thanks to their many instructional cruising videos and DVDs, and Lin’s 11 books about the couple’s life afloat.Lin’s most recent work, Bull Canyon: A Boatbuilder, a Writer and other Wildlife, breaks with this tradition by addressing the time they moved to an isolated California canyon 60 miles inland to build their
Boat Girl: A memoir of youth, love & fiberglass, written by Melanie Neale, is a first-hand account of growing up aboard a cruising sailboat.

Legend Reborn

by Sail Staff, Posted November 20, 2008
I well remember watching, at the age of 11, lone sailor Francis Chichester sail into Plymouth, England, at the end of his solo circumnavigation. In the weeks and months before, we had seen the story unfold on our TV screen and marveled that one man could sail what I then considered to be an enormous boat singlehanded. Upon stepping ashore Chichester was knighted by the queen, and later his boat

Cold Comfort Reading

by Peter Nielsen, Posted January 20, 2010
This time of year, with the boats packed up and the waters iced over, we often become armchair sailors by default. There’s no better time to delve into that list of sailing books you've been dying to read. Start with these suggestions from SAIL editors and readers, and send us a few of your own. Get cozy – reading season has only just begun.Dallas
When Gary Jobson saw his first 12-meter at age 12, he dreamed of someday getting a taste of the America’s Cup. Over the next five decades— from his role as tactician for Ted Turner aboard Courageous in 1977 to his role as an ESPN commentator in New Zealand in 2003—Jobson got his taste, and then some. Along the way, he met a host of fascinating characters, often switching from racer to
I’ve always thought people who took their dogs long-distance cruising were more than a little crazy. But after reading Peter Muilenburg’s A Sea Dog’s Tale: The True Story of a Small Dog on a Big Ocean, I’m no longer so sure.
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