Pittman Innovation Awards

Kannad Marine R10 SRS

by Sail Staff, Posted January 10, 2012
The SafeLink can be clipped to a lifejacket and transmits continuously for 24 hours when activated. A flashing LED helps rescuers make visual contact when homing in on the signal after dark. Although the device has not yet been authorized by the FCC and is therefore not for sale in the United States, it hopefully will be soon.

Spinlock Pylon LED

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
The Spinlock Pylon LED lifejacket antenna solves a problem inherent to any conventional emergency light attached to a lifejacket. Namely, when deployed, the light is intermittently blocked either by waves or the victim’s head, making it hard to see in a seaway.
The slippery properties of these synthetic fibers pair well with the sheave’s anodized aluminum bearing surface, yielding low-friction performance at a fraction of the weight of a traditional block. The unit attaches to padeyes or other deck/spar fittings with a Spectra strop held in situ by a Velcro strip.

Cousin Trestec Constrictor

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
As a line comes under load, it is instantly squeezed by the Constrictor’s Aramid jacket and held fast. Simply pull the trip line and catch its dedicated knot in the notch to release the line. According to Cousin Trestec, the lightweight design offers slip-free performance even when working with higher loads, without the risk of abrasion.

Doyle Anomaly Headboard

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
Doyle’s Anomaly headboard solves these dilemmas by affixing the head of the sail to a detachable composite “carriage,” which is attached via a 2:1 tackle to the top sail car on the mast track. When raising sail, halyard tension automatically pulls the carriage into the car where a toggle locks it in place. No more having to attach the head of the sail to the track manually.

Raymarine e7

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
Once onboard, your iPad or iPhone becomes a wireless remote display, and the e7’s Bluetooth connectivity also allows you to control your MP3 music remotely from the helm. A compact Bluetooth remote is also available, and the e7’s LightHouse interface is intuitively structured to make the system easy to operate.

Iridium Extreme

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
The Extreme harnesses Iridium’s proven global voice and data satellite system, and offers plenty of day-to-day value to both racers and cruisers. In addition to providing voice, e-mail and position-tracking connectivity with those at home, the Extreme, which includes a dedicated programmable SOS button, will be invaluable in emergency situations.

2006 FKP Awards

by Sail Staff, Posted March 1, 2006
Freeman K. Pittman, SAIL’s technical editor for many years until his death in 1996, was respected throughout the sailing industry for his great appreciation of excellence and technical innovation in sailing gear. Each year SAIL editors scour the boat shows for the best of the new products on the North American market—the kind of gear that Freeman would have loved. For 2006, editor Peter Nielsen

B&G Triton T41

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
A fully networkable alternative to individual gauges, the T41 was designed with both cruisers and club racers in mind, and offers a lot of engineering bang for the buck. The Micro-C Simnet backbone allows you to daisy-chain other T41s and connect a sounder, compass or Triton masthead sensor, thereby delivering a competitively priced anemometer that uses the same internal components found in B&G’s top-tier 3000 series.

2005 FKP Awards

by Sail Staff, Posted December 19, 2005
As SAIL's enthusiastic and knowledgeable technical editor, Freeman K. Pittman was one of the those people who left a lasting impression on everyone he met. He's remembered by many in the industry as a true connoisseur of excellence and a keen student of technical innovation in sailing equipment. Freeman passed away in 1996, and since then SAIL has worked to keep his memory alive by seeking out
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