Pittman Innovation Awards

Karver Flying Cam Cleat

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
“Every sailor’s ditty bag ought to have one of these things in it,” proclaimed one of our judges. Many of those ditty bags will, of course, belong to racers (dinghy sailors in particular will like the flying cleat for handling loaded working lines more comfortably), but we think cruisers will ultimately find the most creative uses.

2005 FKP Awards

by Sail Staff, Posted December 19, 2005
As SAIL's enthusiastic and knowledgeable technical editor, Freeman K. Pittman was one of the those people who left a lasting impression on everyone he met. He's remembered by many in the industry as a true connoisseur of excellence and a keen student of technical innovation in sailing equipment. Freeman passed away in 1996, and since then SAIL has worked to keep his memory alive by seeking out

Navico 3G/4G Radar

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
While the 3G has longer legs than Navico’s first broadband unit, the BR24, which lost its edge at ranges beyond six miles, it’s the 4G that is the real “long ranger” when it comes to target acquisition. With 50 percent more maximum-range detection ability, the 4G stands tall among 18-20in dome antenna units, behaving more like a big-league open-array unit than comparably sized competitors.

2007 FKP Awards

by Sail Staff, Posted March 6, 2007
Edited by David SchmidtBy definition, sailors are gearheads. Whether it’s a new sail, new electronics, or even a new mainsheet, they’re eager to put their new gear through the paces. Few people recognized this love of gear and need for innovation more than the late Freeman K. Pittman, SAIL’s technical editor from 1982 to 1996. Freeman was widely regarded by members of the marine

H2Out Systems Dryers

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
The SD units range from small canisters suitable for a toolbox up to sizes capable of drying out large interior spaces. SAIL contributing editor Nigel Calder uses an SD to keep his boat’s freezer from icing up. The AVDs feature a transparent cylinder with end caps for connecting to a fuel tank’s vent plumbing.

2009 Pittman Innovation Awards

by Sail Staff, Posted February 3, 2009
As sailors we pit ourselves against the unknown, working to negotiate safe passages through ever-changing oceans and lakes and rivers in weather conditions for which the term “variable” should be considered a euphemism. While each passage or race is unique, one aspect of sailing is universal—namely, that innovation and new technology combine to make our sport easier, safer, and just plain more

Maretron Fluid Flow Monitor

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
The FFM100 fuel flow monitor is the latest addition to the long company’s long list of sensors, modules, cabling, components, displays and software.  The unit converts signals from fuel, water and other fluid sensors into NMEA 2000 data, and when used in conjunction with Maretron’s own positive displacement fuel sensors provides unprecedented accuracy when measuring consumption.
Sailors today live in an era replete with new equipment and innovation. Looking back on the state-of-the-art in February of 1970—when SAIL’s first issue was unveiled—you’d find aluminum was still considered a pretty high-tech material. Wooden spars were still relatively common. Electronics were primitive: LORAN was top dog, and plenty of cruisers used radio direction finders when navigating out

Vetus Rimdrive Bow Thruster

by Adam Cort, Posted January 10, 2012
The propeller and the outer ring connecting the tips of the blades also serve as the motor’s rotor, and the stationary windings are in a tunnel module that slides into a boat’s structural tunnel tube. As a result, there is no bulky motor to install inside the boat, only a compact interface module.
Each winter SAIL honors the memory of the late Freeman K. Pittman, who served as the magazine’s technical editor for 14 years, by recognizing the most innovative new products of the last 12 months in his name. For 2011, SAIL executive editor Charles J. Doane (Cruising Gear), editor-at-large David Schmidt (Racing Gear), senior editor Adam Cort (Safety Gear), electronics editor Ralph Naranjo
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