Profiles

SAIL's Top 40 Sailors who Made a Difference

by Chip Lawson, Posted February 1, 2010
Put two or more sailors in a room and ask them for an opinion on any sailing-related topic, and before you know it you’ll have an argument. Ask a group of SAIL editors for a list of the most influential people in the sailing world and before you know it, you have a brawl.As SAIL magazine marks its 40th anniversary, we decided to highlight the 40 sailors who’ve had the

Alessandro the Great

by Charles J. Doane, Posted March 10, 2011
Sailing around the world in a modified 21-foot Mini Transat 6.5 to set a world record for the smallest boat to circumnavigate non-stop is one thing. Doing the part around Cape Horn with a jury-rigged mast is quite another. In recognition of these impressive feats, the Cruising Club of America is awarding its Rod Stephens Seamanship Trophy to Franco-Italian solo sailor Alessandro di Benedetto in a
As Newport, Rhode Island’s Ida Lewis Yacht Club prepares to celebrate the 10th anniversary of its signature late-summer distance race, it also takes time to remember its namesake—the real life Ida Lewis.As Newport, Rhode Island’s Ida Lewis Yacht Club prepares to celebrate the 10th anniversary of its signature late-summer distance race, it also takes time to remember its namesake—the real life Ida Lewis.
British Olympian Ben Ainslie, just days after competing in AC class racing in Valencia, has been named ISAF Rolex World Sailor of the Year at the 2008 ISAF General Assembly in the Spanish capital of Madrid. Ainslie won his third gold medal at the Qingdao Olympiad (he also has a silver in the Laser) with an overwhelmingly confident win in the Finn dinghy. Ainslie, 31, is the first

Sir Robin Weighs In

by MacDuff Perkins, Posted April 6, 2010
Sir Robin Knox-Johnston is sitting in the lobby of New York’s Algonquin Hotel. He's in town to receive an award from the Cruising Club of America, and he's telling me a story about his encounter with the American astronaut Buzz Aldrin.“He’s a marvelous man, brilliant,” Sir Robin says. “You meet him and you realize that this man was born to be an astronaut. Everything about him, from the
The third leg of the Velux 5 Oceans race boasts the closest finish in solo racing history, with only 40 seconds separating the second and third place finishers. Zbigniew Gutkowski and Chris Stanmore-Major had been within eyesight of each other for much of the 3,500 nautical mile

A Q&A with Pro Match-Racer Stephanie Roble

by SAIL Editors, Posted September 24, 2014
A 2011 graduate of Old Dominion University, Wisconsin native Stephanie Roble has leveraged a stint with the Chicago Match Racing Center to become the third-ranked women’s match racer in the world. She also recently turned pro, sailing aboard boats like the Melges 20 and J/70. In June, Roble and crew Janel Zarkowsky, Maggie Shea and Lara Dallman-Weisstook took third at the Women’s Match Racing World Championships in Ireland.

Solos

by Kimball Livingston, Posted September 12, 2008
Thirty years after the first Singlehanded Transpacific Race, there’s a grassroots, run-what-you-brung, let’s-celebrate-life spirit still thriving in West Coast shorthanded sailing. You won’t find any French celebrity sailors with million-euro budgets. Nobody’s out to beat the world; they’re out to beat their friends. But if you’re thinking pushover, you haven’t met those friends. Let’s pick just

Sunsets: Peter "Spike" Doriean

by Sail Staff, Posted April 8, 2010
The international sailing world was stunned on tuesday April 6 2010 by the news of the sudden death of Peter ‘Spike’ Doriean, 38, one of Australia’s best known professional sailors and one of the nicest guys any of us have had the privilege of knowing.Trimmer on Movistar in the 2005-2006 Volvo Ocean Race and member of the News Corp team in 2001-2002, he was also a regular in the TP 52

Baptism by Boat

by JoJo Nielsen, Posted April 13, 2011
Often the traits of a good crew—teamwork, communication, responsibility, mutual respect—don’t top the list of traits associated with an average teenager. So what happens when you put eleven 16 t0 18 year-olds on a 50-foot Beneteau and send them off to sea for five weeks? I found out last summer, during a sail training program with Broadreach Academic Treks. From disaster to delight, I saw
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