Profiles

As part of our SAILfeed get-to-know-the-bloggers series, I decided to chat next with The Mariner. SAILfeed.com is our blogging site made up of some of the industry's most interesting sailors. They regularly contribute their thoughts and opinions on sailing news, their adventures at sea and boat repair.

Sailing with Superman

by Sail Staff, Posted August 14, 2008
It’s November 9, 1999, and you’re sailing aboard USA-53, Young America, in the second round robin of the Louis Vuitton Cup. Conditions are a little breezy, maybe 18-20 knots of air with fairly large seas off Auckland, New Zealand. The boat seems capable and the crew is 100-percent dialed-in. But then a curious thing happens: In the midst of a tack, while pushed up by the
Around Morrelli & Melvin's design office in Hungtinton Beach, it’s OK to let your mind wander from the long-legged catamarans the company is famous for. Down at the Coast Highway, the welcome sign says Huntington Beach: Surf City USA (hint hint). When Gino Morrelli finds Nat Shaver with a foiler Moth project on the computer screen, the “bust” is a laugh. Minutes before, jaywalking under a warm

The Stan Honey How-To

by Kimball Livingston, Posted February 3, 2011
The giant trimaran that holds the round-the-world sailing record, with the speed to hop from weather system to weather system, and the even larger—suddenly crippled—trimaran that is out there now trying to beat that record . . .“Are fragile,” says Stan Honey. “The premise is to build a china cup that is extraordinarily fast in flat water and 25 knots of breeze. You use the boat’s
Ted Hood’s legacy endures through his nephew Chris Hood who has been designing and building boats for over 20 years, including the award-winning daysailer, the C.W. Hood 32. Chris’s company, C.W. Hood Yachts, is based in Marblehead, Massachusetts.

The Racing Sailor's Menu

by Sail Staff, Posted August 27, 2008
Good nutrition can provide a performance edgeBy Carol M. BareutherThe optimal diet for a racing sailor depends on the kind of sailing being done and whether it requires more brainpower or brawn. Still, there are certain basic nutrition principles that apply to all competitors. Before the Regatta Carbohydrates are your body’s primary fuel and should

SAIL's Top 40 Sailors who Made a Difference

by Chip Lawson, Posted February 1, 2010
Put two or more sailors in a room and ask them for an opinion on any sailing-related topic, and before you know it you’ll have an argument. Ask a group of SAIL editors for a list of the most influential people in the sailing world and before you know it, you have a brawl.As SAIL magazine marks its 40th anniversary, we decided to highlight the 40 sailors who’ve had the

Alessandro the Great

by Charles J. Doane, Posted March 10, 2011
Sailing around the world in a modified 21-foot Mini Transat 6.5 to set a world record for the smallest boat to circumnavigate non-stop is one thing. Doing the part around Cape Horn with a jury-rigged mast is quite another. In recognition of these impressive feats, the Cruising Club of America is awarding its Rod Stephens Seamanship Trophy to Franco-Italian solo sailor Alessandro di Benedetto in a
British Olympian Ben Ainslie, just days after competing in AC class racing in Valencia, has been named ISAF Rolex World Sailor of the Year at the 2008 ISAF General Assembly in the Spanish capital of Madrid. Ainslie won his third gold medal at the Qingdao Olympiad (he also has a silver in the Laser) with an overwhelmingly confident win in the Finn dinghy. Ainslie, 31, is the first

Sir Robin Weighs In

by MacDuff Perkins, Posted April 6, 2010
Sir Robin Knox-Johnston is sitting in the lobby of New York’s Algonquin Hotel. He's in town to receive an award from the Cruising Club of America, and he's telling me a story about his encounter with the American astronaut Buzz Aldrin.“He’s a marvelous man, brilliant,” Sir Robin says. “You meet him and you realize that this man was born to be an astronaut. Everything about him, from the
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