Best Boats

With their compact cockpits, full keels and narrow hulls, the cruising boats of old are like a lone watch-stander, bundled up in foul weather gear, head bowed, arms folded, tucked in under a dodger for shelter.
The twin rudders on this beamy cruiser ensure excellent helm control even when hard on the wind at an aggressive angle of heel. The wide transom incorporates an enormous flip-down swim platform that is raised and lowered with an electric motor and will undoubtedly make you the envy of the anchorage.

Best Boats 2006

by Sail Staff, Posted April 11, 2007
I needn’t point out that sailboats don’t evolve as quickly as electronics, but incremental changes over the years have gone a long way toward making boats safer, easier to sail, and more comfortable to live on. Each instance of applying fresh thinking to common problems—think staying out of the weather, or stowing the main—can claim a little credit for pushing the evolution of sailboats
Are you looking for a daysailer with luscious overhangs, meticulous craftsmanship, and responsive performance? How about a 15-foot dingy that depends on a retractable bulb keel rather than herculean hiking for stability? a stylish performance cruiser? Or a cruising catamaran with a helm station built into the cockpit roof?That's just a taste of the 43 boats you'll find at the boat shows
Rod Johnstone’s latest design taps into a new market segment for the Rhode Island-based company: shoal-draft boats. The versatile J/95 has both twin rudders and a centerboard, neither of which has been seen on J/Boat before. With the ballasted board up the boat draws just 3 feet, while remaining perfectly controllable under full sail. The J/Boats performance ethos remains intact; the boat is
One of the things we liked most about the Outbound 52, which also wins the Best Flagship award this year, is its no-nonsense center-cockpit layout. Where most center-cockpit boats have wide, shallow cockpits that promote a nagging sense of vulnerability, the Outbound 52’s cockpit is deep, narrow, and secure. Relative to the helmsman, the primary winches are installed at waist height on the
The latest in Jeanneau’s deck saloon line promises to be as popular as its predecessors. The distinctive styling has been taken a step further with the inclusion of even bigger portlights to brighten up the accommodations. jeanneauamerica.com   SPECS LOA: 43ft, 9in Beam: 14ft Displacement: 21,450lbs. Draft: 7ft,
An imposing yacht from any angle, Lagoon’s latest cruiser offers the interior space of a 75ft monohull and the deck space of a small aircraft carrier. Okay, so that’s an exaggeration. What’s not is the luxurious standard of cruising comfort offered by boats like this. cata-lagoon.com   SPECS LOA: 56ft LWL: 54ft Beam:

Life at 55

by Dennis Caprio, Posted July 2, 2013
Is 55 the new 45—feet, that is? In much the same way that advances in healthcare have allowed us to feel younger than our years, technological innovations in sailhandling gear and mechanical propulsion have made yachts 50 to 60 feet long a breeze to sail, dock or anchor, even for sailors whose ages are approaching that of their boats’ LOA.
When it’s January in Germany, all roads lead to Düsseldorf. At least they do if you’re a boat person. You can look over a hundred-foot motoryacht that’s been plucked from the nearby Rhine river, paddle a canoe on an intricately landscaped mock river, cast a fly on an alpine stream, get rescued from an overturned Opti on a manmade lake, outfit yourself in bargain-basement foulweather gear or put a deposit on a new sailboat—all without stepping outdoors and all before your lunchtime bowl of goulash.
  • facebook
  • twitter