Ocean Racing

Southern Straits Smashup

by Adam Cort, Posted April 7, 2010
This year’s Southern Straits race, held April 2 by the West Vancouver Yacht Club, was hammered by big winds and even bigger seas, which forced most of the fleet to retire and sent one boat to the bottom: the 30-foot custom racer Incisor.The race, which was marking its 42nd year, features a three separate course across the Strait of Georgia measuring between 58 and 127 nautical

Galley Gourmets

by MacDuff Perkins, Posted September 21, 2010
If the crew of an ocean racer sails on its stomach and a happy, well-fed crew is a skipper’s strongest asset, then the cook is as crucial as the navigator.We asked some competitors in this year’s Newport-Bermuda race how to keep a crew well fed and ready to go. All had years of experience provisioning for offshore racing, leading to as many galley philosophies as there were boats.On
Organizers of the inaugural Atlantic Cup have enlisted two more boats, bringing the fleet total up to five, just one shy of the number they had hoped for when the event was announced late last year.Set to take place May 6-14, the regatta will be held aboard Class 40 sloops—currently all the rage in Europe—and include both an inshore, fully crewed event and a double-handed 260-mile

BSL Leads the Global Ocean Race Fleet

by Meghan Dente, Posted September 26, 2011
Day two of the Global Ocean Race 2011-2012 proved a lively, welcome change from yesterday’s light air start in Palma Bay, Mallorca, Spain. Led by Ross and Campbell Field on BSL, the six double-handed Class 40s continue to race toward the Straits of Gibraltar, and eventually Cape Town, in an effort to complete the first leg of the five-leg, 30,000-mile journey around the globe.   With
After 31 days, brutal weather conditions and an endless stream of boat repairs, Leg 5 of the Volvo Ocean Race has finally come to a close. The arrival of CAMPER in Itajai, Brazil on Tuesday marked the end of the longest stretch of the entire race, and arguably the most challenging segment up to this point.
Why does the Vendée Globe remain, in the eyes of many, the gold standard of global ocean races? Simply put, because of the purity of its challenge.

Drawing Near

by Sail Staff, Posted May 22, 2008
This year’s Artemis Transat Race will go down in the record books as a race that no one wanted to lead: If you did, chances were good that you might face the woes of Michel Desjoyeaux, Seb Josse, and Vincent Riou, all of whom were doing well; all of whom were forced to retire due to either collision with marine life (Desjoyeaux and Riou) or gear failure (Josse). Now the race has taken a brighter

Another Solo Record

by Peter Nielsen, Posted November 12, 2008
The French dominate the world of shorthanded ocean sailing, and the man of the moment among French solo sailors is Francis Joyon.Last winter Joyon became the fastest person to sail single-handed around the world, setting a remarkable time of 57 days, 13 hours, knocking nearly two weeks off the previous record.Last weekend the 52-year-old Frenchman set another record aboard his 97’
The Volvo Ocean Race has been in Boston since the leg winner, Ericsson 4 crossed the finishing line off of Fan Pier on Sunday, April 26. On Saturday, May 9, seven Volvo Open 70's lined up for the in-port racing, held in the waters between Boston and Marblehead, MA. Sadly for the home team, Puma Ocean Racing, Telefonica Blue, a Spanish-flagged entry, walked away with the
On 4 September, Alain Thbault’s hydrofoiling trimaran, L’Hydroptre, became the fastest sailboat on the planet, rifling off two impressive feats in the same day in France’s La Seyne sur Mer. First, the flying tri registered an average speed of 48.72 knots over a distance of one nautical mile; then it fired off an average pace of 51.36 knots over a distance of 500 meters. Even more
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