Ocean Racing

On Thursday March 17, with blisters on her hands and sores on her bottom, sailor Lia Ditton rowed into Antigua, a proud finisher of the Atlantic Rowing Race. For 73 days, she and a partner rowed in 12-hour shifts from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean. They crossed 2,500 miles nonstop with no assistance. Rowing in close quarters

Minis in North America

by Jesse Rowse, Posted August 9, 2010
n early 2007, I sat down with the offshore committee of the Newport Yacht Club and, after much debate, was told that the 21-foot Mini 6.50—the same boat used for Europe’s Mini Transat Race from France to Brazil—would be granted its own division in that year’s Bermuda 1-2 Race.Since then, the number of Minis actively sailing in the United States has doubled, to about 30 boats. Although this
Sailing with fellow Frenchman Loick Peyron, Jean-Pierre Dick has repeated his 2007-08 triumph in the Barcelona World Race by winning the second running of the double-handed event aboard Virbac-Paprec 3 in 93 days, 22 hours, 20 minutes and 36 seconds.Finishing in second place about 23 hours later were Spanish sailors Iker Martinez and Xabi Fernandez aboard Mapfre. In third
A new monohull record, a giant-killing performance by a cruising catamaran and a straight-out-of-the-box victory for the new Puma Volvo 70: those were some of the high points of last summer’s dramatic Transatlantic Race 2011.George David’s super-maxi Rambler 100 blasted across the 2,975-mile course from Newport, Rhode Island to Lizard Point off Cornwall, England, in just over 6 days, 22
After finishing second in the past three legs, PUMA finally tasted victory in one of the most thrilling stretches of the entire Ocean Volvo Race. Less than 13 minutes separated PUMA and Telefónica as they both reached Itajai, Brazil, on April 6, having traveled over 6,700 miles from Auckland, New Zealand.
San Francisco Bay sailors are accustomed to having the big professional round-the-world races pass them by some 93 degrees of latitude to the south. A diversion to the Golden Gate makes no sense.

Desjoyeaux Out

by Sail Staff, Posted May 16, 2008
He had the resume, the credibility, and the talent. What he hadn’t expected was the whale. French superstar sailor Michel Desjoyeaux, skipper of the IMOCA 60 Foncia, and an early favorite to win the Artemis Transat race—he commanded a spot on the leader board early on—had an unexpected encounter with a whale on May 15 (Day 5 of the race), and was forced to retire.

The Miracle Race

by David Schmidt, Posted November 4, 2008
The Vendee Globe is the real deal: A singlehanded sailor, a massively powerful, 60-foot canting-keel carbon-fiber racing shell with some of the fastest sails around, and Planet Earth. Solo. No assistance. Just the sailor, aboard his/her boat, taking on the world. What could be simpler?Obviously, “simple” is not a standard word used to describe the work list necessary to just arrive on the

Robo-boat

by Sail Staff, Posted May 7, 2009
A solo-transatlantic journey is no easy undertaking, but try doing it without any crew at all. A group of students from ETH Zurich in Switzerland are currently testing a fully autonomous sailboat that’s theoretically able to reach any destination on its own. At just over 13 feet LOA and 1100 pounds, the Avalon robotic sailboat will be competing against 11 other

Hummus the hard way

by David Schmidt, Posted August 24, 2009
So there we were last Friday evening, sitting on the rail of Tom Hill’s magnificent new Reichel/Pugh 75 Titan XV during the 2009 Ida Lewis Distance Race off Newport, Rhode Island, happily munching on carrots and hummus, when a curious thing happened: a torrent of saltwater exploded over everybody seated at the back of the sled. It happened so suddenly that all I could
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