Inshore Racing

Should you find yourself needing a bit of reassurance as to why you sail, a glimpse of the 300-plus beautiful classic yachts that were assembled in Saint Tropez in September for the 2009 Classic Boats Regatta will immediately have you remembering exactly why you fell in love with our sport-and lifestyle-in the first place.
It was Wind 1, Yachts 0 on Monday as Tim Lynch’s J/24, Erin, took a death roll and sank on the last leg of Race 5 of the Bermuda International Invitational Race Week regatta. Erin was flying downwind under spinnaker in 30 knots of wind on Bermuda’s Great Sound, when she took a knockdown and stuck her mast in the water. The cockpit and cabin flooded almost immediately.No

January 2010 Class of the Month: The Shields

by Sail Staff, Posted December 30, 2010
Back in the early 1960s, America’s Cup veteran and long-time one-design proponent Cornelius “Corny” Shields decided that the cadets at the various maritime academies in this country needed quality sail training if they were to become truly competent seamen.He hired Sparkman & Stephens to design the 30-foot Shields, one of the most striking one-design racers ever, with its long overhangs,
At US Sailing’s Rolex Miami OCR on January 28, Zach Railey took home the gold in the Finn class. The 2008 Olympic Silver medalist is gunning for gold at this summer’s Olympics, and he’s off to a good start.
The Philadelphia Cup Regatta returns on September 29 on the Delaware River with a series of one design races between the Betsy Ross and the Walt Whitman bridges, two of the city's most famous and picturesque bridges.

One-Designs Shine at Key West

by Sail Staff, Posted February 8, 2008
When Peter Craig took over management of Key West Race Week in 1994, the event featured one racing circle, 12 boats, and seven starts. Since then, Craig and Premiere Racing (his management company) have grown the competition to 261 boats—177 of which are racing one-design, with the rest racing either IRC or PHRF. This means that in 2008, roughly 30-percent of the fleet is racing handicap;

2008OlympicCrazyGlasses

by Sail Staff, Posted August 9, 2008

Learning to fly

by David Schmidt, Posted April 23, 2007
The emergence of the Foiler Moth has been one of sailing’s most pyrotechnic developments. The Moth is a development class which by definition, means that it’s capable of true innovation, such as hydrofoiling at speeds up to 27.9 knots. It was only recently that Foiler Moths—the Bladerider, the Prowler, the Mistress, and the Hungry Tiger—became commercially

The O’pen Revolution

by Meredith Laitos, Posted November 2, 2009
When Tomas Nores, father of three sons under the age of 12, watched his kids’ sailing program dwindle from 100 enthusiasts to 8 miserable children in Optis, he knew something was wrong. The water was warm year-round in their hometown of Miami, Florida, and the breeze was always blowing, yet his kids were on the verge of throwing in the towel. Determined to not give up, Nores drove ten kids from
A local salvage crew has recovered Erin, the J/24 that sank on Tuesday after broaching in heavy air at the Barcardi Bermuda International Invitational Race Week regatta.Erin went down midway through the downwind leg of Race 5 in 30 knots of wind, after she rounded up in a broach that put her mast in the water, flooding the cockpit and cabin. Her crew was immediately
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