Cruising News

Sailing Icons: The Painkiller

by Sail Staff, Posted March 2, 2012
No afternoon at October’s U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis is complete without at least one of those delicious rum drinks called a Painkiller. Indeed, the Annapolis show and the Painkiller are inextricably entwined in the minds of regular showgoers. 
Betty Nissen had a dream for a life at sea. Sixty years ago, she and her husband, John, co-founded what is now the largest organization for voyaging cruisers in the world.

Sailing Post-Sandy

by Wally Moran, Posted February 11, 2013
Typically, by the time November rolls around, I’m well clear of the Northeast and headed south for the winter. This year, though, various factors delayed me, so that when Hurricane Sandy swept through in late October, I was still in Lake Erie.
For the first time since its creation in 1986, this year’s ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers) sailors will have a choice of routes after leaving the Canary Islands in November. The newly created ARC+ will include a three- to five-day stopover in Minelo, Cape Verde Islands.
Bahamian reefs, which have suffered for years from over-fishing, pollution and plastic waste, now have a new environmental menace to contend with.  Fortunately, this one is delicious.
If the recent Annapolis Boat Show were to have a theme song it would have to be Dylan’s “Times they are a Changing”—and not just because of the weather, which went from semi-tropical to polar in the space of only a few hours Saturday afternoon.
By the time you read this, Kinship, an American-flagged Saga 43, will have made its second Atlantic crossing in little over half a year. As I write, the yacht is staging in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, just off the coast of Morocco.
Gesturing toward an oil painting rich with painterly light, French maritime historian Daniel Charles declares, “Monet was an observant sailor, and the boat that we see here would have been the first he had seen that was rigged the new way. A painting such as this is not only art, it is a textbook.”
After over five months of sailing from the Pacific Northwest, down the west coast of North America, through the Panama Canal and on into the Caribbean, we were finally approaching St. Maarten. We were only 100 miles from our final destination, and a giddy feeling of anticipation had begun to set in. 
“I’m waiting, “ said Charles Doane, SAIL’s executive editor. “That’s all anybody is doing.” Doane, along with many other boat owners, has been forced to delay moving his Tanton 39 cutter Lunacy south from New England, and eventually to Bermuda, because of approaching hurricane Sandy.
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