Cruising News

Vanishing Sail

by Lindsey Silken, Posted May 4, 2012
Of the hundreds of sailing vessels that were introduced by Scottish settlers in the 19th century and launched in the West Indies, very few remain. Filmmaker Alexis Andrews is documenting the boatbuilders of Carriacou in the Grenadines, who are trying to keep this dying skill alive.
Effective August 21, 2012, NOAA has begun publishing its entire United States Coast Pilot series online, where the books are available as free downloadable PDFs.
Summer Sailstice is relaunching its website Summersailstice.com in time for its 13th celebration of the year’s longest weekend of daylight right before the Summer Solstice on June 22. 
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has announced that it will no longer print traditional paper nautical charts come mid-April of this year.
LightSquared, the company that hopes to build a broadband cellular telephone network that has been shown to interfere with GPS signals, has filed for voluntary Chapter 11 restructuring in the wake of the FCC’s decision to not grant it permission to move ahead with its original plans.
Shelley Ferguson knows too well that each day is an opportunity to appreciate life. When she had the chance to spend an August afternoon sailing on the 12-Meter, Valiant, in Nantucket, where her family resides, she didn’t hesitate.
As Cape Wind, the proposed offshore wind farm off Massachusetts, enters its second decade of controversy and legal wrangling, a similar, smaller installation off nearby Block Island may soon become the country’s first operational offshore wind farm.
The last time I went frostbiting it was February in Chicago, and it was freezing. Not far offshore, ice floes loomed and just inshore, a layer of frost covered the hardened beaches of Lake Michigan, which bordered the black ice on Lake Shore Drive.
The International Rescue Group delivers humanitarian aid by boat. When a natural disaster strikes, it can take humanitarian aid programs weeks to mobilize and ship in resources. But what if those resources could already be nearby? That’s where the International Rescue Group (IRG) comes in.  
In early September, scientists in the Arctic reported that floating sea ice had fallen to the lowest level ever observed, and a trio of sailors took their cue.
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