Boat Reviews

CNB 105

by Sail Staff, Posted October 5, 2006
Designer Philippe Briand has had a long and fruitful relationship with the CNB yard in Bordeaux, France, where this yacht, essentially a larger version of Briand’s 95-footer, was built. The deck layout, particularly the after sections, has been designed for outdoor living, particularly when the yacht is anchored. The table, sofa, and banquettes can all be adjusted by remote control, and the bar

Grand Soleil 37

by Tom Dove, Posted July 17, 2007
On a gorgeous autumn day, I found myself trimming the mainsheet aboard a Grand Soleil 37 during a race series in Annapolis. There couldn’t have been a better way to test the sailing performance of this new boat from Italy.Though there are relatively few of this builder’s boats in the U.S., Grand Soleil is well respected among the cognoscenti here and in Europe. Its nicely

Wauquiez Pilot Saloon 55

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
The largest design to date in the venerable Wauquiez line of seagoing craft is moving toward a launch date expected at the end of the year. A main feature of the design is the arch that supports the mainsheet, bimini, cockpit speakers, and lights. The yacht’s primary winches are electric and can be controlled from either of the dual steering stations. Both the main and genoa sheets are led aft

Beneteau 31

by Bill Springer, Posted November 3, 2008
I’m always impressed when a boat design shows you can teach an old dog new tricks. Thirty-one-foot coastal-cruising designs have been around since builders started using fiberglass to build hulls, so it’s easy to think that it’s all been done before. But the new Beneteau 31 has innovative solutions and incremental changes that have a positive effect on comfort, functionality, aesthetics, and

Weta Trimaran

by Kimball Livingston, Posted July 7, 2009
The breeze was mild, but still it made an impression to see Dave Bernsten walk away from the tiller of his 14-foot trimaran, step to the bow, fiddle with an adjustment, then mosey back aft and resume his duties at the helm. The moment speaks to the value proposition of the Weta as stable and forgiving, a viable family playground that will crank out speed thrills when the

Hunter Edge

by Tom Dove, Posted August 17, 2009
Every sailor’s perfect boat would be big enough to accommodate the whole family in luxury, perhaps 80 feet or so, and would have a draft of one or two feet for easy gunkholing, an efficient sail plan, good stability and speed, and mechanical aids for handling lines. The mast would lower easily to get under bridges. Oh, yes. It would not cost too much, would be beautiful to

Tartan 4000

by Adam Cort, Posted August 3, 2010
The category of performance cruiser is one that has accommodated everything from stripped-down racers masquerading as weekenders to ice-breakers pretending to be competitive with the help of a generous PHRF rating. The Tartan 4000, though, is a performance cruiser in the truest and best sense of the word—a boat that does well on all points of sail and takes good care of its crew,

Beneteau 50

by Sail Staff, Posted August 10, 2010
The first thing you notice about this new 50-footer is its sleek styling, like a scaled-down version of the 58. The second is the fixed arch upon which the mainsheet is secured, thus keeping it out of the cockpit. The third is the open, inviting interior. A choice of layouts makes this boat equally at home cruising along a coastline or making long ocean

Hallberg-Rassy 64

by Sail Staff, Posted March 11, 2011
This new luxury center-cockpit cruiser carries the renowned Swedish company’s design and build ethos to a logical conclusion. While only 3 feet longer on deck than the 62 it replaces, the 64 has an extra 7 feet of waterline length that will bring its performance up a level. Polars predict double-digit speeds in anything over 10 knots of wind, just what you want for a quick dash across the

Tartan 4700

by Adam Cort, Posted April 25, 2012
Today’s performance-cruisers are faster than ever. But are they going to take care of you in heavy weather in the same way as those pre-IOR boats many of us grew up admiring? Fortunately, there are still builders and designers out there who are willing and able to combine the best of both old and the new in boats like the raised-saloon Tartan 4700.
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