Boat Reviews

Seaquest 36

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2004
The British are coming! The British are coming! Actually, it's the British-built, Reichel/Pugh—designed Seaquest 36. After a successful launch and wins notched in races all over Europe, the Seaquest 36—replete with narrow-chord bulb keel, high-octane sailplan, weight-saving interior, and impressive polar numbers—has arrived. It's a flat-out racing design concerned more with

Westerly 66

by Kimball Livingston, Posted July 14, 2005
The mission was to create a true sailor’s boat for a family that had recently spent time cruising in a powerboat and didn’t want to give up what they liked about that—having a room with a view and steering from inside on rainy days. The mission leader was West Marine’s founder, Randy Repass. Repass wasn’t interested in having “just” a boat. Because his heart and his pocketbook belong to the world

Catalina 250 Centerboard

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
The Catalina 250 Centerboard has some unusual features for a pocket cruiser—a built-in swim ladder and stern-pulpit seats. And it has the essentials: an easy-to-fill water-ballast system, a spacious cockpit and accommodation plan, a big kick-up rudder and a durable centerboard, and a stove, sink, and a bit of counter space in the galley. There is also a private head compartment. You'll be amazed

Morris M42

by Bill Springer, Posted September 21, 2006
With the launch of the 42-foot M42, it appears Morris Yachts is hoping to corner the market on the “big luxury daysailer” category. And if the success of the 36-foot M36 is any indication, Morris may be on to something. Like the 36, the 42 has easy sailhanding features, a self-tacking jib, and a painted carbon-fiber rig. It also has an elegantly simple, open accommodations

Lagoon 420

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Even though the first Lagoon 420 is being launched only this month, this cat has attracted much attention and many purchase orders since it was first announced a little over a year ago. What makes this yacht so newsworthy is that it comes equipped with electric propulsion as standard equipment; diesel engines are available, of course, but only as an option. The standard setup consists of a

Broadblue 435

by Mark Corke, Posted April 2, 2007
I’ve had a penchant for sailing on two hulls ever since I built a 26-foot racing micro-multihull some years ago. That boat routinely sailed at double-digit speeds but was frequently wet, so it was with some enthusiasm that I stepped aboard the considerably larger Broadblue 435 for a test sail on Chesapeake Bay. On deckThe 435 has plenty of deck space for walking

Mah 36

by Bill Springer, Posted July 18, 2008
Fountaine Pajot’s new Mah 36 replaces the popular Athena 38 as the company’s entry-level boat. Since many cat builders have shied away from smaller cruising models, I was eager to see how the Mah could provide interior headroom and volume without looking top-heavy or sacrificing bridgedeck clearance. I was also interested in learning how or if the shorter waterline would

Hallberg-Rassey 54

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
This new 54-foot long-distance cruiser from the board of German Frers has received considerable interest since its introduction in Sweden last fall. An all-inclusive hydraulics package makes sail control easy, and the large engine room makes it easy to walk around and inspect the yacht's systems. The engine space is made quieter by perforated aluminum linings that cover the soundproofing for
I needed little excuse to escape the New England cold to test-sail the new Hunter 50 Center Cockpit in balmy Palmetto, Florida, last December. I’d inspected hull #1 at the Annapolis Boat Show last fall so I knew the interior was spacious, but how would this newest and biggest Hunter perform under sail? The Gulf of Mexico didn’t serve up much wind, but Hunter’s chief tester,

Lagoon 400

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
The new mid-range cat from Lagoon looks like a useful cruiser. From stem to stern, it reeks of practicality, from the trademark pillbox-style windows (let in light without heat when the sun’s high) to the hardtop cockpit canopy (everyone always fits a bimini, so why not make it permanent?). The sails can be controlled from the elevated helm station and between the open-plan
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