Boat Reviews

Jeanneau 33i

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
It’s great to see boatbuilders investing in smaller boats again, and this new baby of Jeanneau’s North American range looks like just the thing for a young family. She’s a simple boat, with double cabins fore and aft and the possibility of sleeping two people amidships on the settees. The heads/shower looks to be a good size and there’s a decent galley and a small nav table.

Dufour 405

by Sail Staff, Posted May 19, 2010
French builder Dufour Yachts added this sparkling new 40-footer to its range of Umberto-Felci-designed performance cruisers late last year.

Delphia 40.3

by Duncan Kent, Posted August 4, 2010
This versatile midrange boat from Poland can be ordered with single or dual wheels, deep or shallow-draft keels, or with a swing keel. There are three layout options, one of which has four sleeping cabins.  

Hanse 375 Cruiser

by Duncan Kent, Posted August 10, 2010
Established in 1993 on the Baltic coast of the former East Germany, Hanse Yachts has gone from strength to strength by building performance-oriented yachts at affordable prices. Having recently extended its production facilities, Hanse is now Germany’s second largest boat builder after Bavaria. All its boats are designed by Judel and Vrolijk, a renowned team of naval architects that has had input
Few designs pack as much fun into 18 feet as the Hobie Mirage Tandem Island, a two-person pedal-or-paddle kayak that converts to a sail-powered trimaran by attaching a pair of akas and amas, and stepping a carbon-fiber mast. The roller-reefing loose-footed mainsail carries a generous amount of sailcloth up high and is supported by vertical battens. The boat’s robust rotomolded hull encourages

Hood 54-foot Motorsailer

by Sail Staff, Posted June 2, 2005
Legendary sailor and designer Ted Hood has created a larger version of his 48-foot motorsailer and is building it on a custom basis at the TeKad facility in Tuzla, Turkey. While many of the belowdecks features are similar to those of Hood’s well-known Little Harbor 54 and 60 designs, the waterline on this yacht is far longer, the freeboard is much higher, there is a flush deck, and, of course,

Malo 41

by Sail Staff, Posted February 4, 2003
The Malo 41 has many of the same features that impressed us on the other Swedish boats we sailed—strong no-nonsense construction combined with lush mahogany interior joinery work—as well as a few unique twists of its own. For example, the distinctive traveler arch over the cockpit, long a Malo trademark (they call it their TARGA system), works very well, and its height can be

PDQ Antares 44i

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005
Voluminous cruising catamarans have a reputation for being ideal charterboats, but the boat builders at PDQ Yachts are quick to point out that the new Antares 44i cruising cat is not intended to be a charterboat. Rather, they say, it’s a sturdy, well-equipped bluewater cruiser built specifically for private owners. They also report that the accommodations plan is well suited to long-term

Sabre Spirit

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Big daysailers that are attractive, quick, and easy to sail continue to gain in popularity for a simple reason—the design concept fits a growing number of owners (and prospective owners). The folks at Sabre understand this, and the 36-foot Sabre Spirit is a worthy entry into this ever-expanding field. Most of my test sail took place during a friendly race staged off Marblehead, Massachusetts. I
The Class 40 began in 2004 as a scaled-down, less-expensive version of the Open 60 and Open 50 monohulls that are the darlings of professional shorthanded offshore racing in Europe. The idea was to give amateurs an affordable class that was a step up from the Mini Transat 6.5, but pros have since embraced the boat as well.In the 2006 Route du Rhum race from France to Guadeloupe, 25 Class
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