Boat Reviews

Outremer 49

by Sail Staff, Posted August 4, 2010
This fast cruising cat from France looks sharp and reportedly performs well too. Twin wheels and a clever hard/soft bimini design are notable features. There are several layout options, and the yard claims to have kept weight down to enable a decent cruising payload to be carried.For more information on the Outremer 49, click

Portland Pudgy

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 23, 2010
Once, in the interests of research, I spent an afternoon bobbing around in a liferaft. Ever since, I’ve had an obsession with bilge pumps, because what I learned was this: I don’t ever want to spend time in a liferaft again. The discomfort was one thing, and should not be downplayed, but what really got to me was the sense of helplessness. A liferaft is a passive device, at the mercy of wind and

The Hunter 18

by Charles J. Doane, Posted July 13, 2011
the new Hunter 18 replaces the Hunter 170, which for several years was a mainstay in Hunter’s line of small daysailers. Like the 170, the 18 can serve as both an easy-to-manage family daysailer and as a lively performance boat for those with more experience.   At a glance the two boats look quite similar, sporting open transoms, centerboards and small sprayhoods forward. On closer inspection,

Sabre 386

by Charles J. Doane, Posted February 28, 2005
Since its founding by Roger Hewson more than 20 years ago, Sabre Yachts has excelled at building boats under 40 feet. The old Sabre 28 is certainly one of the best pocket cruisers ever marketed, and Hewson himself often asserted that the company's core boats were its 36-footers. I personally have always favored the Sabre 38, both the Mark I and Mark II models, built

Nauticat 515

by Sail Staff, Posted July 19, 2004
Nauticats have always been solid, stable, and comfortable, and the newest and biggest Nauticat is no different. There's nothing radical about the Nauticat 515. Its long overhangs are something of a rarity among new cruising designs, and its displacement of nearly 53,000 pounds will make it a stately offshore passagemaker. The hull is made of meticulously hand-laid fiberglass, and the fit and

Santa Cruz 53C

by Sail Staff, Posted June 6, 2006
Santa Cruz 53CDesigned for serious passagemakers, the new Santa Cruz 53C is a bluewater-cruising version of the company’s 52-foot racer/cruiser. While it maintains the original’s lightweight design, new cruising-friendly features include hull windows, self-tacking jib, carbon-fiber boom, optional shoal-draft keel, and a fiberglass dodger for more comfortable foul-weather sailing. The 53C boasts

Najad 440

by Sail Staff, Posted July 12, 2005
Following a number of successful collaborations with the Judel/Vrolijk design team, Najad has improved the windward performance of this new 44-footer by giving it a narrow V-shaped entry forward. For solid downwind performance, the aft sections have a more pronounced U shape and slightly more beam. The keel is also deeper and narrower than on previous models, and the spade rudder is well balanced

Passport 515 CC

by Tom Dove, Posted August 11, 2008
Contemporary styling and custom features provide exciting alternatives for the serious cruiserSome people are satisfied with the basics—a basic car, off-the-rack clothes, a standard house floor plan, a production boat. But others are not. Bob Perry's Passport Vista 515 Center Cockpit cruiser comes from a builder who specializes in satisfying sailors who like to have

Pittman 90

by Craig Davis, Posted January 23, 2006
Over the last decade or so, the America’s Cup and Maxi-yacht classes have benefited from most of the research money going into sailing. Today’s Maxi owners aren’t shy about pushing design far beyond what is permitted in the America’s Cup. Maxis are larger than the Cup yachts and increasingly use canting keels and water ballast to improve performance. Reichel/Pugh, German Frers,

Le Breton SIG45

by Dave Baldwin, Posted March 3, 2006
You have to admire Hugo Le Breton for setting the bar high with his new SIG 45. His goal was simple and ambitious: to combine the high-performance design elements of an ocean-racing multihull with the style of a contemporary cruising monohull. The result is a 45-foot racer-cruiser that comfortably accommodates six and can hit top speeds of over 20 knots. The SIG 45 features
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