Boat Reviews

Delphia 37

by Tom Dove, Posted January 29, 2007
Just when a seasoned boat reviewer thinks he’s seen all the possible variations among midsize cruising monohulls, along comes a vessel to jar him out of that notion. The Delphia 37 did that for me. The designer is unknown in America, the factory is in Poland, and the boat is a delight to sail. On DeckThe deck and cockpit will work nicely for daysailing,

Beneteau 46

by Tom Dove, Posted May 27, 2008
Beneteau boats keep getting better looking while retaining the consistent quality and good finish that keep owners coming back as they move up in size. The new 46 could be an “ultimate boat” for many sailors who have experience in smaller vessels and are now looking for a stylish, fast, spacious boat that they can continue to sail into their retirement

Salona 45

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
The Salona 45 is a modern racer/cruiser. It’s a new design from a new company—the first of this Croatian builder’s line to enter the U.S. market. On deckIt’s obvious that this plumb-bowed craft is firmly situated at the performance end of the design spectrum, especially when the deck-box stern seat is removed to expose an open transom and make space for a racing crew. My

Beneteau 54

by Sail Staff, Posted February 3, 2009
The Beneteau design team worked with Berret-Racoupeau Yacht Design and the Nauta Design Group to develop this new flagship of the Beneteau fleet. The design brief specified an elegant coachroof with good visibility, interior volume and comfort, ease of handling, and good performance offshore.Belowdeck, the long coachroof windows combine with the hull ports to allow lots of natural light to

Jeanneau 57

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
If proof were needed of the high standard of modern production boatbuilding, Jeanneau’s new flagship would be high on the list of exhibits. It features a bunch of nice detail touches that not too long ago would have been the preserve of much more expensive yachts. Philippe Briand drew the lines for this express cruiser, which combines a powerful triple-spreader rig, refined

Alerion 33

by Peter Nielsen, Posted June 2, 2010
Alerion’s take on electric drive utilizes the most up-to-date technology available. It involves a 7.5kw AC motor, powered by a pair of 160amp 12V DC lithium iron phosphate batteries from Mastervolt. These batteries, the first developed for the marine market, won a 2010 Freeman K. Pittman Innovation Award from SAIL. They have three times the cycle capacity of a lead-acid battery, and can

Radical Bay 8000

by Charles J. Doane, Posted August 4, 2010
Having long been interested in the concept of putting a parallel or “biplane” rig on a catamaran, I was very happy to have a chance to sail the new Radical Bay 8000 catamaran after the 2010 Annapolis sailboat show. The cool thing about sailing the boat was that I really had no idea what I was doing.

J/111

by Adam Cort, Posted August 25, 2010
According to designer Alan Johnstone, the brief for the new 36ft 6in J/111 one-design was for a boat that he and the rest of the J/Boats crew would want to sail—and it shows.During a recent daysail off Newport, Rhode Island, hull #1 reveled in picture perfect sailing conditions, with winds out of the east in the mid to high teens. Sailing to windward, the boat was balanced and easy to

Dragonfly 28 Sport

by Jeremy Evans, Posted May 31, 2011
Quorning Boats has been building trimarans in Denmark for more than 40 years. Run by the father and son team of Borge and Jens Quorning, the company specializes in Dragonfly fast cruisers with a “swing wing” system that reduces beam by more than 50 percent for trailering or berthing.The Dragonfly 28 is the smallest in the range. It’s available as a Touring 28 with aluminium spars or

Harryproa Visionarry

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005
Proas were all the rage back in the 60s when tacking your entire rig (shunting) was a small price to pay for the speed potential of a multihull that had the reduced wetted surface of one main hull and one stabilizing hull. As catamarans and trimarans continued to set speed records and become increasingly popular and easy to sail, it looked like the proa had gone the way of
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