Boat Reviews

Open 5.70

by Bill Springer, Posted May 11, 2007
With its flat, plane-friendly Groupe Finot hull shape, dual rudders, square-headed full-batten main, and lifting, narrow-chord bulb keel, the Open 5.7 is obviously designed for the high-end of the performance spectrum. It’s only 20 feet long, displaces merely 1,020 pounds (330 pounds are in the keel), and boasts a working sail area of 280 square feet. Off the wind the 5.7 carries a

Hanse 430e

by Sail Staff, Posted August 6, 2008
Once the term “mid-size cruiser” was used to describe boats from 30 to 35 feet, but many of today’s popular “mid-size” boats are larger. The new 43-foot Hanse 430 is performance oriented, as might be expected; it was designed by Judel/Vrolik, designer of Alinghi’s America’s Cup boats. As I found during my test sail in Miami, the 430e (epoxy) is a quick cruiser rather than a racer.

X-34

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
Many of today's boats are designed to be both quick and comfortable, and X Yachts continues to stake its claim in the performance-cruiser market. The X-34 is light, nimble, and sturdy, as I learned firsthand during several hours of thrashing into a stiff 17-to-20-knot headwind and steep chop on a recent 50-mile test sail/delivery.CONSTRUCTIONThe hull and deck are built

Morris M29

by Peter Nielsen, Posted May 11, 2009
This pretty little boat was conceived in response to requests from owners of bigger Morrises for a smaller, simpler daysailer. The earlier Morris daysailers—the M36, M42, and M52—were father/son collaborations between Tom and Cuyler Morris, but Tom’s lengthy illness meant the M29 bears Cuyler’s stamp. Hull #1 was completed and launched in the frigid depths of the Maine winter,

Oyster 655

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
You can’t talk about dream yachts without someone dropping the Oyster name in the first few minutes. Designer Rob Humphreys’s brief for the new 655 was for a boat that combined luxurious amenities with first-class performance. The latter was achieved not only by clever hull design, but by the extensive use of carbon fiber and Kevlar throughout the boat. If you didn’t think

Scandinavian Cruiser 20

by Sail Staff, Posted August 3, 2010
Classic lines and long overhangs distinguish this 20ft daysailer. Below the waterline are a sleek underbody and modern high-aspect ratio foils; above, there's a rotating carbon-fiber wingmast.For more information, visit Scandinavian Cruisers.SPECS:LOA 19ft 7in BEAM 4ft 3in DRAFT

Beneteau First 30

by Charles J. Doane, Posted August 5, 2010
Beneteau has done a good job in recent years burnishing its racecourse mojo with its new generation of “First” series racer-cruisers. The very first, some will recall, was the 30.

Prout 50SW

by Sail Staff, Posted December 9, 2010
The words sleek and fast aren’t normally associated with the Prout name. Words like “sturdy” and “well-finished” more typically come to mind. Nonetheless, the new Prout 50SW is very different from the—how to say this diplomatically—peculiarly English Prouts of the 1980s and 1990s. The signature mast-aft rig of those earlier boats, with their tiny mainsails and huge jibs, is long gone, as is the

Hunter e36

by Adam Cort, Posted September 30, 2011
The Hunter e36 feels right from the moment you step aboard and is somehow more than the sum of its parts. In both appearance and functionality, it works well and is a pleasure to sail.   Construction The hull and deck on the e36 are standard for Hunter, with balsa coring above the waterline and solid fiberglass below. The layup includes a modified

Sabre 386

by Charles J. Doane, Posted February 28, 2005
Since its founding by Roger Hewson more than 20 years ago, Sabre Yachts has excelled at building boats under 40 feet. The old Sabre 28 is certainly one of the best pocket cruisers ever marketed, and Hewson himself often asserted that the company's core boats were its 36-footers. I personally have always favored the Sabre 38, both the Mark I and Mark II models, built
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