Boat Reviews

Oyster 53

by Tom Dove, Posted September 29, 2006
Carbon-based life evolves, silicon-based computers evolve, and so do fiberglass yachts. Oyster Marine understands this principle well and through steady improvements and innovations has established new standards for all its designs and systems without sacrificing the essential qualities that have been successful in earlier models. The Oyster 53 is a prime example. Since its introduction in
Click here to read a PDF version of this reviewBack in 2004, Jeanneau caused quite a stir with the launch of its stylish Sun Odyssey 54 DS (deck saloon). Italian designer Vittorio Garroni had worked more with cars than boats when he came up with the fresh-looking 54 DS, and he wasn’t bound by any conventional

Spirit 56

by Malcolm White, Posted August 7, 2008
When you look at the classic mahogany brightwork, teak decks, and fine ends of a Spirit-built yacht, you are to be forgiven if you suspect it dates from the early twentieth century. Then you notice the rod rigging, the carbon-fiber spars, and the foil keel and lead bulb under a cedar-stripped hull—all part of the latest technology. This is how today’s builders blend the above-water

Beneteau First 50

by Tom Dove, Posted August 11, 2008
There's a whole lot more here than headroom and easily handled sailsThe hull form is sleek and sophisticated, the eyebrows above the ports denote competence and self-worth, and some of the accessories belowdeck are fine leather. The Beneteau First 50 starts with style, but it carries through with performance. An owner looking for a fast cruiser, an occasional racer, and/or a

J/95

by David Schmidt, Posted June 17, 2009
It’s no secret that J/Boats is an industry leader when it comes to fast, innovative sailboats; the retractable sprit pole introduced with the J/105 gave new life to the asymmetric spinnaker, and the company practically invented the sport-boat genre. Now the Rhode Island-based company has done it again, this time with the sporty J/95, a 31-footer with twin rudders, a

Sensei 9M

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
Here’s an unusual import from Turkey, a country famed more for its beautiful coastline than for boat building. The Sensei is as up-to-the-minute in design and construction as it’s possible to be; the hull is a vacuum-bagged sandwich of vinylester resin and Corecell reinforced with carbon fiber, the T-keel will reward good helming, and the styling is delightfully Italian.

Scandinavian Dory 18

by Sail Staff, Posted August 3, 2010
Lovers of traditional boats will enjoy the molded lapstrake hull of this little rowing/sailing dory. There are plenty of modern touches though, including options like a free-standing carbon-fiber mast with a wishbone boom, and oars, rudder and centerboard also built in carbon fiber.For more information, visit Scandinavian

Beneteau 58

by Peter Nielsen, Posted August 10, 2010
Beneteau's flagship is an excellent example of the new generation of boats in the 50-60 foot range that are coming out of France. It looks great on the water, sails very well, is well built and nicely detailed, and has all the space above and below decks that you could reasonably want.

Lagoon 560

by Sail Staff, Posted March 11, 2011
The latest boat from the world’s largest catamaran builder replaces the long-in-the-tooth Lagoon 57 and joins the 500 and 620 in Lagoon’s revamped flagship line. And flagship is about right; you’d need an 80ft monohull to get anywhere near the space you’ll find on this big cruiser. The four-cabin/four-head layout is likely to be most popular, but there is also a five-cabin version. Lagoon’s

Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 44DS

by Adam Cort, Posted March 2, 2012
I tend to look ask​ance at boats like the Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 44DS, under the assumption that dramatic styling and scads of space belowdecks leave little room in the design brief for performance. In the case of the 4DS, though, I couldn’t have been more wrong.
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