Boat Reviews

Sabre 386

by Charles J. Doane, Posted February 28, 2005
Since its founding by Roger Hewson more than 20 years ago, Sabre Yachts has excelled at building boats under 40 feet. The old Sabre 28 is certainly one of the best pocket cruisers ever marketed, and Hewson himself often asserted that the company's core boats were its 36-footers. I personally have always favored the Sabre 38, both the Mark I and Mark II models, built

Nauticat 515

by Sail Staff, Posted July 19, 2004
Nauticats have always been solid, stable, and comfortable, and the newest and biggest Nauticat is no different. There's nothing radical about the Nauticat 515. Its long overhangs are something of a rarity among new cruising designs, and its displacement of nearly 53,000 pounds will make it a stately offshore passagemaker. The hull is made of meticulously hand-laid fiberglass, and the fit and

Santa Cruz 53C

by Sail Staff, Posted June 6, 2006
Santa Cruz 53CDesigned for serious passagemakers, the new Santa Cruz 53C is a bluewater-cruising version of the company’s 52-foot racer/cruiser. While it maintains the original’s lightweight design, new cruising-friendly features include hull windows, self-tacking jib, carbon-fiber boom, optional shoal-draft keel, and a fiberglass dodger for more comfortable foul-weather sailing. The 53C boasts

Najad 440

by Sail Staff, Posted July 12, 2005
Following a number of successful collaborations with the Judel/Vrolijk design team, Najad has improved the windward performance of this new 44-footer by giving it a narrow V-shaped entry forward. For solid downwind performance, the aft sections have a more pronounced U shape and slightly more beam. The keel is also deeper and narrower than on previous models, and the spade rudder is well balanced

Passport 515 CC

by Tom Dove, Posted August 11, 2008
Contemporary styling and custom features provide exciting alternatives for the serious cruiserSome people are satisfied with the basics—a basic car, off-the-rack clothes, a standard house floor plan, a production boat. But others are not. Bob Perry's Passport Vista 515 Center Cockpit cruiser comes from a builder who specializes in satisfying sailors who like to have

Dufour 455

by James Jermain, Posted September 23, 2005
Forty years ago Michel Dufour dragged boatbuilding into the industrial age by being one of the first to design boats specifically for production building methods. The company came out of some recent financial troubles and launched a “new era” in 2003. Since then two parallel but carefully matched lines of cruising boats have been introduced.One is a group of performance

Baltic 79

by Sail Staff, Posted January 18, 2006
Delivered to an Italian owner last year, this carbon-composite hull has a lifting keel that can reduce draft from 14 feet, 9 inches to less than 10 feet. The rig includes a new “canoe” boom that is supposed to be easier to use and store the mainsail better than the more traditional wide, flat Park Avenue boom. The nonoverlapping jib makes the yacht easy to handle, and the

Shipman 63

by Sail Staff, Posted January 18, 2006
When their carbon/epoxy-hulled 50-footer was launched two years ago, it was named European Boat of the Year. But the Shipman design team has decided there is also a need for a yacht in the 60-foot range that can make offshore passages quickly and effortlessly. The result is this pilothouse design the Shipman team is calling “the racer’s ocean cruiser.” The lightweight

True Wind 32

by Bill Springer, Posted September 22, 2004
The True Wind 32 presents an interesting amalgamation of features. It's a 32-foot cat with a rigid open bridgedeck and is built to sail faster than wind speed in the right conditions, to provide the amenities of a pocket cruiser, and to be capable of easily folding up onto a street-legal trailer.During my test on Florida's Biscayne Bay in 10 knots of breeze and flat water, we hit 8 knots on

Hoyt H-10

by Bill Springer, Posted September 21, 2006
You’ll find Opti-mists and 420s on many yacht-club docks, but hasn’t the time come for a more modern small-boat design? Designer Garry Hoyt thinks so. His new H-10 is designed to be a stable, fast, and fun dinghy that will fill the gap between the Opti and bigger boats like the Laser and 420. To keep the boat light and easy for a kid to handle alone, the 10-foot-long hull is
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