Boat Reviews

X-40

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2004
The new X-40 is a chip off the old block. Flush with the success of the X-43 and X-46, X-Yachts designer Niels Jeppesen has drawn this new 40-footer to be as sexy, sturdy, comfortable, and responsive as its larger siblings. And it seems to have all the necessary ingredients. The cored hull is light and stiff, the sailplan has power to burn, and the hand-polished teak joinery is sure to turn some

Melges 17

by Sail Staff, Posted February 28, 2005
With active fleets of M, C, A, and other scows racing on the Great Lakes, why are the folks up in Zenda, Wisconsin, at Melges Performance Sailboats introducing a new scow class? "We're presently losing a lot of our young sailors once they graduate out of the X-Boat, Laser, and 420," says Melges VP Andy Burdick. "The Melges 17 will bring new excitement to scow

Dorade's Second Wind

by Charles J. Doane, Posted November 16, 2007
Are these things we call sailboats really capable of some independent existence, or only such existence as we imbue them with? This was a question I was asking myself one August morning as I scrambled onto the tiny afterdeck of a certain 52-foot Olin Stephens–designed yawl named Dorade and prepared to hoist her mizzen spinnaker in place of her

Sunsail 384

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
The charter company commissioned this good-looking cat from South African company Robertson & Caine. Designed by Morelli & Melvin, the boat should sail nicely as well as providing plenty of room for both charter parties and family cruisers. It’s a galley-up design, geared towards outdoor living, and offer all the usual catamaran advantages – plenty of lounging space, a level

mxNext

by Adam Cort, Posted August 5, 2013
Ever since Russian naval architect Vlad Murnikov burst onto the scene with his Whitbread racer Fazisi back in 1989—a time when Russia was still the Soviet Union—his designs have defied the norm.

Saga 409

by Tom Dove, Posted November 4, 2005
If you want to see a dramatic example of how far monohull cruising boats have evolved in the past couple of decades, study the Saga 409 for a while. Its blister-coachroof/deck-saloon configuration opens up the interior and makes space for vital systems below while looking sleek from the outside. It has beautifully curved cherry bulkheads and doors that look as if they might

Flying Tiger 10 M

by Bill Springer, Posted November 4, 2005
Internet forums are great for swapping tips on everything from where to anchor in Anchorage, Alaska, to finding an obscure part for a boat that’s no longer in production. Judging from the Flying Tiger 10-Meter forum on sailinganarchy.com, they also appear to be a great way to design and market a sportboat. And, of course, this boat is designed to a “box” rule—but the “box” is actually the size of

Wauquiez Centurion 40S

by Sail Staff, Posted July 20, 2004
There's a new generation of 40-somethings designed to appeal to other 40-somethings. I refer, of course, to the group of 40-foot cruiser-racers aimed at folks who are not over the hill but have passed the hair-shirt-racer stage of life. The Wauquiez Centurion 40s is a nice example of this type, with attractive, comfortable accommodations ensconced in a fast, handsome hull powered by a big,

J/92

by Bill Springer, Posted August 22, 2006
Ever since Rod Johnstone built Ragtime, which ended up being the J/24 prototype in 1974, J Boats has produced boats that are fun to race as well as comfortable and manageable enough for family cruising. The new 30-foot J/92s fits that design brief perfectly. The J/92 has been very successful on racecourses in Europe and the U.S., and the J/92s is intended to be a more stable,

Dubois 130

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Designed by Dubois Naval Architects, this 130-foot aluminum sloop was built for an experienced American owner, who was planning to buy a large motoryacht until he saw another Dubois design similar to this one in Auckland. Janice, like many Dubois designs, has a low profile and spacious accommodations for owner and crew, but this design, says Dubois, has an even lower superstructure than
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