Boat Reviews

Pacific Seacraft 40

by Bill Springer, Posted June 13, 2008
The sturdy, traditionally styled offshore cruisers of Pacific Seacraft are part of the history of the fiberglass-boat industry. The company fell on hard times, however, and was sold last year. This is far from the first time a venerated brand has gone out of business, but Pacific Seacraft is being reborn, and in an unlikely place. Unlikely until you think about it.As the

Expedition 55

by Charles Mason, Posted August 11, 2008
Ted Hood combines the best of power and sailThree years ago Ted Hood and I had a long discussion about what would make a yacht move comfortably and confidently under both sail and power. It was the middle of February, and we were returning from a morning sail in the lumpy Gulf Stream off Miami aboard a new Hood–designed 48-footer with many of the qualities we were

Andrews 28

by Bill Springer, Posted March 10, 2009
The Andrews 28 sportboat is Canadian builder Sylvana Yacht’s answer to the question “Can you build a boat that’s fast, stiff, easy to sail, and easy to trailer with enough interior space to be a comfortable cruiser as well?” It’s a question that builders have been trying to answer for years, and at first glance, the Andrews 28 may be on to something. I took a test sail off

Beneteau First 40

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
The latest in Beneteau’s ever-popular First series of racer-cruisers wears its pedigree in plain sight; the same sleek profile as the earlier, large Farr-designed Firsts, the 50 and 45, the same powerful rig and deep torpedo-bulbed keel, the same family-friendly interior that keeps the good times coming even when the racing’s over. It’s all just condensed into a smaller, more

CW Hood 32

by Peter Nielsen, Posted June 7, 2010
Late last fall, I looked over a partly completed hull sitting in a small workshop at a boatyard in Marblehead, Massachusetts. Even minus keel, paint, trim and other essentials, it was apparent that this would be a fast and attractive boat. Less than four weeks later, with snow carpeting the small islands off Marblehead, the boat was being sea-trialed; and yes, it was indeed fast and

Lagoon 450

by Sail Staff, Posted August 4, 2010
This impressive new offering from the French builder succeeds the long-lived 440. It is one big cat, over 25ft wide and with a cast interior fitted out in light woods to make the most of the sunlight filtering through the plentiful ports and windows.For more information on the Lagoon 450, click

Beneteau First 40

by Sail Staff, Posted September 22, 2010
The Farr-designed First 40 is the follow-up to Beneteau’s highly successful First 40.7, a boat that won a series of key international races and quickly established itself as a performer. Over the boat’s 11-year lifespan, Beneteau has sold more than 800 First 40.7s to customers around the globe. Launched in Europe a year ago, about 100 of these new 40-footers have already been sold, and the design

The Hylas 56

by John Kretschmer, Posted July 6, 2011
The Hylas 56 is the logical successor to the popular passagemaker, the Hylas 54. Introduced in 1999, the 54 proved that big, powerful cruisers could be efficiently handled by shorthanded crews, and several 54s have since logged circumnavigations. Why add two feet? For several reasons. The 56’s cockpit is longer and more refined, the aft cabin has more headroom, the rudder is

J/100

by , Posted March 29, 2005
As first impressions go, J/100 hull number two stood out in fine company moored off the New York Yacht Club's Harbour Court facility in Newport, Rhode Island. From shore I sized up the boat lying still at her mooring—plumb bow, clean and simple deck, wide-open cockpit, narrow blue hull, and rakish lines. But how would this new daysailer go? The boat's prime harbor

Etap 37s

by Tom Dove, Posted August 23, 2004
After sailing two or three hundred boats, I thought there would be no utterly novel features for me to discover aboard the next one. I was mistaken. Boat designers are a creative lot, and when they're engineers as well, the result can be a vessel loaded with innovative features. The Belgian-built Etap 37 is just such a package of pleasant surprises. Or maybe I shouldn't be surprised; after all, a
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