Boat Reviews

Broadblue 435

by Mark Corke, Posted April 2, 2007
I’ve had a penchant for sailing on two hulls ever since I built a 26-foot racing micro-multihull some years ago. That boat routinely sailed at double-digit speeds but was frequently wet, so it was with some enthusiasm that I stepped aboard the considerably larger Broadblue 435 for a test sail on Chesapeake Bay. On deckThe 435 has plenty of deck space for walking

Mah 36

by Bill Springer, Posted July 18, 2008
Fountaine Pajot’s new Mah 36 replaces the popular Athena 38 as the company’s entry-level boat. Since many cat builders have shied away from smaller cruising models, I was eager to see how the Mah could provide interior headroom and volume without looking top-heavy or sacrificing bridgedeck clearance. I was also interested in learning how or if the shorter waterline would

Hallberg-Rassey 54

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2008
This new 54-foot long-distance cruiser from the board of German Frers has received considerable interest since its introduction in Sweden last fall. An all-inclusive hydraulics package makes sail control easy, and the large engine room makes it easy to walk around and inspect the yacht's systems. The engine space is made quieter by perforated aluminum linings that cover the soundproofing for
I needed little excuse to escape the New England cold to test-sail the new Hunter 50 Center Cockpit in balmy Palmetto, Florida, last December. I’d inspected hull #1 at the Annapolis Boat Show last fall so I knew the interior was spacious, but how would this newest and biggest Hunter perform under sail? The Gulf of Mexico didn’t serve up much wind, but Hunter’s chief tester,

Lagoon 400

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
The new mid-range cat from Lagoon looks like a useful cruiser. From stem to stern, it reeks of practicality, from the trademark pillbox-style windows (let in light without heat when the sun’s high) to the hardtop cockpit canopy (everyone always fits a bimini, so why not make it permanent?). The sails can be controlled from the elevated helm station and between the open-plan
Admirers of the growing armada of beautiful daysailers should be familiar with the work of Doug Zurn. The Marblehead, Massachusetts-based designer drew the gorgeous Bruckmann 42, a fast daysailer/weekender with traditional lines above the waterline and ultra-modern foils down below. Zurn's latest design is the Marblehead 22, which builds on the blend of classic looks and up-to-the-minute

Outremer 49

by Sail Staff, Posted August 4, 2010
This fast cruising cat from France looks sharp and reportedly performs well too. Twin wheels and a clever hard/soft bimini design are notable features. There are several layout options, and the yard claims to have kept weight down to enable a decent cruising payload to be carried.For more information on the Outremer 49, click

Portland Pudgy

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 23, 2010
Once, in the interests of research, I spent an afternoon bobbing around in a liferaft. Ever since, I’ve had an obsession with bilge pumps, because what I learned was this: I don’t ever want to spend time in a liferaft again. The discomfort was one thing, and should not be downplayed, but what really got to me was the sense of helplessness. A liferaft is a passive device, at the mercy of wind and

The Hunter 18

by Charles J. Doane, Posted July 13, 2011
the new Hunter 18 replaces the Hunter 170, which for several years was a mainstay in Hunter’s line of small daysailers. Like the 170, the 18 can serve as both an easy-to-manage family daysailer and as a lively performance boat for those with more experience.   At a glance the two boats look quite similar, sporting open transoms, centerboards and small sprayhoods forward. On closer inspection,

Maximus

by David Woodley, Posted July 14, 2005
New Zealanders Bill Buckley and Charles St. Clair-Brown believe they have created the fastest and most innovative monohull in the world. Just as pedigrees count for a lot in the horse business, the 24-carat lineage of the new 100-foot carbon-fiber canting-keeled sloop is certainly impressive. Designed by Greg Elliott and Clay Oliver, both alumni of the team that created the current holder of
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