Boat Reviews

Contest 65CS

by Sail Staff, Posted June 2, 2005
Contest Yachts has been building well-found cruising boats for decades. Its 50-footer is a proven passagemaker with thousands of open-sea miles under its keel. But with the trend clearly moving toward larger semi-custom designs, Contest is offering a new 65-footer that it believes will fill a niche. With a masthead rig and powerful sailplan, the yacht has been designed to perform well over a full

Etap 24i

by Tom Dove, Posted July 11, 2005
Belgian builder Etap is no stranger to innovations, and the new Etap 24i is filled with them. This little cruiser has most of the clever features of its bigger siblings, including the ability to sail even when filled with water; it has an optional shoal-draft tandem keel to make trailering easy, toerails that double as cleats, and the best antiskid decks you’re likely to

Hanse 400e

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Hanse Yachts's stylish 40-foot 400e (the "e" stands for the epoxy resin used in the hull) is the first in the Judel/Vrolijk–designed line the German builder is billing as "crossover boats." It's already made a splash at U.S. boat shows with its clean hull lines and innovative styling belowdecks. I took one out for a test drive off Marblehead, Massachusetts, to see if "crossover boat" is just a

Draft Dodger

by Peter Nielsen, Posted October 31, 2011
Britain’s boatbuilding industry is a shadow of what it was back in the 1970s and 80s, but a handful of boutique yards still thrives around its shores. One such is Northshore Yachts, whose Southerly range has survived four decades of the boom-and-bust cycles that saw once-mighty production brands tumble.

Hallberg-Rassy 54

by Sail Staff, Posted January 16, 2006
Construction has begun on this new 54-foot center-cockpit design from German Frers, and the first yacht in the series is expected at the end of August. There’s an owner’s cabin aft and two guest cabins forward. Construction is glass with PVC core except in the keel area, which is solid-glass laminate. Spars and rod rigging are by Seldn, and the auxiliary is a 110-horsepower Volvo diesel. A

Briand 105

by Carlos Serra, Posted June 2, 2005
It’s a sparkling summer morning in Palma, Mallorca, and the crew of the 105-foot sloop Gliss (derived from the Dutch word glinsteren, which means to shine or glitter with brilliance) is waiting for her owner and his guests to arrive. The cook has already returned from the market with fresh produce, local bread, and freshly caught sea bass. At the appointed hour the owner’s party arrives onboard,

Pendennis 157

by Sail Staff, Posted June 2, 2005
Not many yachts are as innovative as this Liebowitz & Pritchard–designed 157-foot aluminum motorsailer. Drawn by Pedrick Yacht Design, this sloop can sail well and motor at speeds of up to 23 knots; with its centerboard up, the draft is just under 7 feet, allowing it to enter anchorages normally out of bounds for yachts this size.A major design issue was how to make the higher-than-average

Tripp 78

by Sail Staff, Posted January 16, 2006
Bill Tripp has designed this lifting-keel sloop to be as comfortable racing in the North Atlantic as it is cruising in the Mediterranean. A deep-ballast package creates high stability under sail even as the lifting feature allows access to harbors and shallow anchorages. On deck, the foredeck is flush with a low house aft. There’s a guest cockpit with flush dodgers just behind

Mal 40

by Tom Dove, Posted September 21, 2006
The Mal 40 is the latest gem from a highly regarded Swedish builder of cruising boats from 36 to 46 feet. Like all Mals, this one can be customized extensively, an appealing feature for the sailor who has been around enough to have strong opinions.It’s not a racing boat, but it is exactly the sort of vessel you’d want for extended coastal cruising or ocean voyaging. Not that it’s

Perry 59

by Kimball Livingston, Posted September 29, 2006
With a name like Free Range Chicken, the explanation for how this yacht got its name needs to be offered up front. “It’s my ninth boat,” says owner Bruce Anderson. “My first boat was a Catalina 27 that I sailed out of Chicago. Fast forward to boat number six, and I’m in Southern California with a custom Andrews 36. With that boat I thought maybe we would build a bunch of sisterships, so I wanted
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