Boat Reviews

Bavaria 30

by Sail Staff, Posted August 10, 2005
The Bavaria 30 is an entry-level cruiser with all the features that any sailor would look for in a coastal cruiser. With each of its two cabins equipped with a double bunk, hanging locker, and small open area, the interior is large enough to accommodate two couples or a small family on a weekend (or even longer) cruise. The straight settees in the saloon are over 6 feet

Perry 57

by Sail Staff, Posted May 3, 2005
A market is often the mother of invention. According to Australian cruising-catamaran designer and builder Bryan Perry, "A number of people saw the Perry 43 and liked it. They said they wanted something bigger along the same lines." So he checked on what was already available and came up with the Perry 57 to scratch the itch of his potential customers. The resulting design is 57 feet long and

Pacific Seacraft 38

by Sail Staff, Posted August 7, 2008
Pacific Seacraft has new management, is also building and marketing Saga Yachts, and has announced the launch of a new boat of its own. This is slated to be a highly stable medium-displacement cruiser with a traditional cutter rig. But instead of producing another Bill Crealock design, this time the company tapped Bob Perry to come up with a brand-new boat with all the features Pacific Seacrafts

Best Boats 2010

by Nigel Calder, Posted November 19, 2009
SAIL scoured the fall boat shows for the shining stars among this year's crop of new boats. Here they areThere was a buzz around the docks at the Annapolis and Newport shows, and it wasn't the sound of the plague of locusts we were half expecting, given the disasters of recent months and years. No, the sun shone, the water sparkled, the brightwork gleamed, and you all came to the show.

Tested: Hunter 40

by Charles J. Doane, Posted August 20, 2013
Hunter Marine—now known as Marlow Hunter—celebrated its 40th birthday and a recent change in ownership by introducing its latest mid-size cruising boat, the new Hunter 40, in something of a hurry last fall. 

Saga 409

by Tom Dove, Posted November 4, 2005
If you want to see a dramatic example of how far monohull cruising boats have evolved in the past couple of decades, study the Saga 409 for a while. Its blister-coachroof/deck-saloon configuration opens up the interior and makes space for vital systems below while looking sleek from the outside. It has beautifully curved cherry bulkheads and doors that look as if they might

Flying Tiger 10 M

by Bill Springer, Posted November 4, 2005
Internet forums are great for swapping tips on everything from where to anchor in Anchorage, Alaska, to finding an obscure part for a boat that’s no longer in production. Judging from the Flying Tiger 10-Meter forum on sailinganarchy.com, they also appear to be a great way to design and market a sportboat. And, of course, this boat is designed to a “box” rule—but the “box” is actually the size of

Wauquiez Centurion 40S

by Sail Staff, Posted July 20, 2004
There's a new generation of 40-somethings designed to appeal to other 40-somethings. I refer, of course, to the group of 40-foot cruiser-racers aimed at folks who are not over the hill but have passed the hair-shirt-racer stage of life. The Wauquiez Centurion 40s is a nice example of this type, with attractive, comfortable accommodations ensconced in a fast, handsome hull powered by a big,

J/92

by Bill Springer, Posted August 22, 2006
Ever since Rod Johnstone built Ragtime, which ended up being the J/24 prototype in 1974, J Boats has produced boats that are fun to race as well as comfortable and manageable enough for family cruising. The new 30-foot J/92s fits that design brief perfectly. The J/92 has been very successful on racecourses in Europe and the U.S., and the J/92s is intended to be a more stable,

Dubois 130

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Designed by Dubois Naval Architects, this 130-foot aluminum sloop was built for an experienced American owner, who was planning to buy a large motoryacht until he saw another Dubois design similar to this one in Auckland. Janice, like many Dubois designs, has a low profile and spacious accommodations for owner and crew, but this design, says Dubois, has an even lower superstructure than
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