Boat Reviews

Lipari 41

by Sail Staff, Posted August 14, 2009
Fountaine-Pajot’s new model is available in three- or four-cabin layouts, and if you want to load up the boat with friends and family, the saloon (which can seat eight) and the large cockpit can hold a few more. The saloon and galley open into the large cockpit, which features a raised helm position. LOA 39ft 2in, LWL 38.8ft, beam 22ft 1in, draft 3ft 8in, displacement 16,755

Landing School 30

by David Schmidt, Posted April 28, 2010
Most production boats are conceived with a design brief from a builder who has a targeted market in mind. Not so the Landing School 30 (LS-30). It’s built by students at a non-profit boatbuilding and design college. The Landing School and its resident designer, Steve Dalzell, design and build boats as part of the curriculum: selling them is an afterthought. As a result, only two or three LS30s

Jeanneau 409

by Sail Staff, Posted August 4, 2010
Replacing the long-lived Sun Odyssey 39i, the Sun Odyssey 409 is a handsome midsized performance cruiser. Drawings show a new cabintop style with angular portlights, a deck layout where headsail and main sheets are led aft to the twin helms, and a sailplan with a small non-overlapping jib.For more information, visit

Beneteau Sense 50

by Tom Dove, Posted August 10, 2010
This design from Beneteau marks a new approach to accommodations and deck layout in a boat that'll make an excellent coastal cruiser with offshore capability. Among the innovative features is a catamaran-like cockpit layout with a dinette opposite a conventional bench seat.   SPECS: LOA: 49ft 15in BEAM: 15ft 9in DRAFT: 5ft 5in (std) 6ft 9in (shoal)

The Dufour 375

by Sail Staff, Posted May 5, 2011
There was a time when the variable-draft sailboat was a common sight along North America’s coastlines. Tartan, Pearson, Morgan, C&C, Sabre, Hunter and other builders all offered largish cruising boats with centerboards or swing keels, and many of those now-elderly vessels still populate the thin waters of the Carolinas, Chesapeake and Florida.   Changes to racing rules in the
The concept of seakindliness has largely been lost to modern sailors—with the possible exception of the bluewater cruising community. The basic idea is that a boat’s motion through the water—its “feel,” so to speak—should be as comfortable as it is seaworthy. 

Cookson 50

by Sail Staff, Posted May 31, 2005
The Cookson 50 from New Zealand's Cookson Boats belongs to the new generation of high-performance boats sporting canting keels and blistering speed potential. Mick Cookson, who worked with Farr Yacht Design to develop the concept, didn't start out to build a canting-keeler. "This began as a fixed-keel boat with a trim tab," he said. But Cookson also wanted a lightning-fast boat that had enough

J/109

by Sail Staff, Posted February 4, 2003
The J/109 is more than a high-performance boat with cruiser-friendly add-ons; it's a well-conceived, well-executed dual-purpose boat that comes close to being all things to all sailors. Fast, easy to handle, stable, and spacious, the J/109 can serve as a competitive racer, comfortable cruiser, shorthanded daysailer, and a family weekender.The accommodations plan includes a proper nav

Eleuthera 60

by Sail Staff, Posted July 12, 2005
This flagship of the Fountaine-Pajot fleet made its U.S. debut at the Strictly Sail Show in Miami, Florida, last February. The 60-footer reflects the builder's decade of experience building its 56-foot Marquises design, with its well-proportioned sailplan and well-apportioned interior spaces. This new model has slightly wider hulls than the 56-footer, which has created more

Anna

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Launched in June at the Brooklin Boat Yard, Brooklin, Maine, this 56-foot classic with a modern underbody borrows heavily from Stormy Weather, one of S&S’s most famous designs, which dates to the mid-1930s. With a few exceptions the yacht is a scaled-up version of Stormy, but, says S&S president and chief naval architect Greg Matzat, while most aesthetic elements from the older boat—sheer
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