Boat Reviews

X-40

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2004
The new X-40 is a chip off the old block. Flush with the success of the X-43 and X-46, X-Yachts designer Niels Jeppesen has drawn this new 40-footer to be as sexy, sturdy, comfortable, and responsive as its larger siblings. And it seems to have all the necessary ingredients. The cored hull is light and stiff, the sailplan has power to burn, and the hand-polished teak joinery is sure to turn some

Melges 17

by Sail Staff, Posted February 28, 2005
With active fleets of M, C, A, and other scows racing on the Great Lakes, why are the folks up in Zenda, Wisconsin, at Melges Performance Sailboats introducing a new scow class? "We're presently losing a lot of our young sailors once they graduate out of the X-Boat, Laser, and 420," says Melges VP Andy Burdick. "The Melges 17 will bring new excitement to scow

Dorade's Second Wind

by Charles J. Doane, Posted November 16, 2007
Are these things we call sailboats really capable of some independent existence, or only such existence as we imbue them with? This was a question I was asking myself one August morning as I scrambled onto the tiny afterdeck of a certain 52-foot Olin Stephens–designed yawl named Dorade and prepared to hoist her mizzen spinnaker in place of her

Sunsail 384

by Sail Staff, Posted August 17, 2009
The charter company commissioned this good-looking cat from South African company Robertson & Caine. Designed by Morelli & Melvin, the boat should sail nicely as well as providing plenty of room for both charter parties and family cruisers. It’s a galley-up design, geared towards outdoor living, and offer all the usual catamaran advantages – plenty of lounging space, a level

mxNext

by Adam Cort, Posted August 5, 2013
Ever since Russian naval architect Vlad Murnikov burst onto the scene with his Whitbread racer Fazisi back in 1989—a time when Russia was still the Soviet Union—his designs have defied the norm.

Gunboat 34

by Sail Staff, Posted August 23, 2004
Flush with the success of the aggressive Gunboat 62, Peter Johnstone and multihull designers Morelli & Melvin have brought the same go-fast and go-comfortable approach to the new Gunboat 34. It's designed to be easy to singlehand and to easily log double-digit speeds under sail. All lines lead to the helm station, which is located in the center of the open bridgedeck under a hardtop. Living

Catalina 387

by Kimball Livingston, Posted October 12, 2004
To get yourself from any Southern California harbor to Catalina Island, you're typically going to set full sail in a moderate breeze. Half a day later you'll moor in a sunny lee where you will hang out and probably socialize boat-to-boat for a few days before reaching back home to your freeway connection.That's the classic Southern California cruise weekend, and a lot of the world cruises or

Catalina 22 Sport

by Bill Springer, Posted July 11, 2005
Gerry Douglas, principle designer at Catalina Yachts, has brought a classic back to life with the launch of the new Catalina 22 Sport. The original Catalina 22 helped launch Frank Butler’s fledgling boatbuilding company in 1969 and was in continuous production until a MkII version was launched in the early ’90s. The MkII’s beam was wider by 8 inches so the cockpit could be more spacious, but you

Nautitech 40

by Bill Springer, Posted August 22, 2006
At first glance the Nautitech 40 seems to have solved the conundrum all large cruising-cat designers face—how to draw a boat that’s spacious on the inside and sleek and sexy on the outside. Nautitech’s answer is to unify the topsides by seamlessly blending the coachroof into the hard cockpit roof. As with all designs, a compromise was required. Instead of having a single helm station on the back

Sunreef 122

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Sunreef Yachts has built many catamarans in the 60-foot range but is now moving into larger yachts, many of them custom projects. One example is this 122-foot aluminum yacht, which will sail with a crew of six. The crew is housed in the forward sections of the port hull, and a full-service galley for the entire ship’s company, along with the crew’s dining area, is located in the after section of
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