Boat Reviews

Tested: The Hanse 385

by Duncan Kent, Posted March 18, 2014
The Hanse 385 is a sensibly designed boat full of practical innovations that can only have been created by someone who knows exactly what it's like to go cruising under sail. 

Hood 54-foot Motorsailer

by Sail Staff, Posted June 2, 2005
Legendary sailor and designer Ted Hood has created a larger version of his 48-foot motorsailer and is building it on a custom basis at the TeKad facility in Tuzla, Turkey. While many of the belowdecks features are similar to those of Hood’s well-known Little Harbor 54 and 60 designs, the waterline on this yacht is far longer, the freeboard is much higher, there is a flush deck, and, of course,

Malo 41

by Sail Staff, Posted February 4, 2003
The Malo 41 has many of the same features that impressed us on the other Swedish boats we sailed—strong no-nonsense construction combined with lush mahogany interior joinery work—as well as a few unique twists of its own. For example, the distinctive traveler arch over the cockpit, long a Malo trademark (they call it their TARGA system), works very well, and its height can be

PDQ Antares 44i

by Sail Staff, Posted November 4, 2005
Voluminous cruising catamarans have a reputation for being ideal charterboats, but the boat builders at PDQ Yachts are quick to point out that the new Antares 44i cruising cat is not intended to be a charterboat. Rather, they say, it’s a sturdy, well-equipped bluewater cruiser built specifically for private owners. They also report that the accommodations plan is well suited to long-term

Sabre Spirit

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Big daysailers that are attractive, quick, and easy to sail continue to gain in popularity for a simple reason—the design concept fits a growing number of owners (and prospective owners). The folks at Sabre understand this, and the 36-foot Sabre Spirit is a worthy entry into this ever-expanding field. Most of my test sail took place during a friendly race staged off Marblehead, Massachusetts. I
The Class 40 began in 2004 as a scaled-down, less-expensive version of the Open 60 and Open 50 monohulls that are the darlings of professional shorthanded offshore racing in Europe. The idea was to give amateurs an affordable class that was a step up from the Mini Transat 6.5, but pros have since embraced the boat as well.In the 2006 Route du Rhum race from France to Guadeloupe, 25 Class

Moorings 5800

by Charles J. Doane, Posted March 6, 2014
A stately cruising cat worthy of a potentate

Bruckmann Daysailer 42

by Sail Staff, Posted August 10, 2005
Measuring in at over 42 feet long and displacing more than 17,000 pounds, the Bruckmann Daysailer is designed to be an easy-to-sail head-turner with graceful lines and long overhangs that’s equally at home on a harbor cruise or a weekend getaway. The final product seems to be up to the task. The light, stiff hull is a composite of Corecell, E-glass, and vinylester resin. The decks are

X-35

by Sail Staff, Posted May 3, 2005
Danish builder X-Yachts is set to debut its new X-35 One Design later this year, but don’t be fooled by the "One Design" label. It's more than just a 35-foot one-design racer. Like lots of new launches these days, it's designed to be sporty, easy to sail, and comfortable belowdecks.Strict one-design rules have been established to foster fleet development for those who want to race, but the

Precision_23

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
Not all pocket cruisers are water-ballasted. The Jim Taylor-designed Precision 23 achieves stability with fixed ballast and a shallow keel/centerboard configuration. With the board up the minimum draft is just under 2 feet; draft increases to 5 feet, 4 inches with the board down. The Precision also bucks pocket-cruiser convention in that it has a conventional cabin-top and legitimate side decks.
  • facebook
  • twitter