Boat Reviews

Weta Trimaran

by Kimball Livingston, Posted July 7, 2009
The breeze was mild, but still it made an impression to see Dave Bernsten walk away from the tiller of his 14-foot trimaran, step to the bow, fiddle with an adjustment, then mosey back aft and resume his duties at the helm. The moment speaks to the value proposition of the Weta as stable and forgiving, a viable family playground that will crank out speed thrills when the

Hunter Edge

by Tom Dove, Posted August 17, 2009
Every sailor’s perfect boat would be big enough to accommodate the whole family in luxury, perhaps 80 feet or so, and would have a draft of one or two feet for easy gunkholing, an efficient sail plan, good stability and speed, and mechanical aids for handling lines. The mast would lower easily to get under bridges. Oh, yes. It would not cost too much, would be beautiful to

Tartan 4000

by Adam Cort, Posted August 3, 2010
The category of performance cruiser is one that has accommodated everything from stripped-down racers masquerading as weekenders to ice-breakers pretending to be competitive with the help of a generous PHRF rating. The Tartan 4000, though, is a performance cruiser in the truest and best sense of the word—a boat that does well on all points of sail and takes good care of its crew,

Beneteau 50

by Sail Staff, Posted August 10, 2010
The first thing you notice about this new 50-footer is its sleek styling, like a scaled-down version of the 58. The second is the fixed arch upon which the mainsheet is secured, thus keeping it out of the cockpit. The third is the open, inviting interior. A choice of layouts makes this boat equally at home cruising along a coastline or making long ocean

Hallberg-Rassy 64

by Sail Staff, Posted March 11, 2011
This new luxury center-cockpit cruiser carries the renowned Swedish company’s design and build ethos to a logical conclusion. While only 3 feet longer on deck than the 62 it replaces, the 64 has an extra 7 feet of waterline length that will bring its performance up a level. Polars predict double-digit speeds in anything over 10 knots of wind, just what you want for a quick dash across the

Tartan 4700

by Adam Cort, Posted April 25, 2012
Today’s performance-cruisers are faster than ever. But are they going to take care of you in heavy weather in the same way as those pre-IOR boats many of us grew up admiring? Fortunately, there are still builders and designers out there who are willing and able to combine the best of both old and the new in boats like the raised-saloon Tartan 4700.

Sabre 426

by Sail Staff, Posted February 4, 2003
Over the past 10 years, Sabre has introduced a line of medium-displacement performance-oriented cruising boats ranging in size from 36 to 45 feet, all designed by Jim Taylor, that have been exceptionally well executed. We were not at all surprised, therefore, to find that Sabre and Taylor have again done a superb job of balancing performance, liveaboard comfort, and quality construction in a

Island Spirit 40

by Sail Staff, Posted February 4, 2003
The Island Spirit 40, designed and built in South Africa, has many of the characteristics people look for in an offshore boat: solid construction, simple, robust, and accessible systems, safe and efficient sailhandling gear, a roomy interior, a manageable price, and good sailing performance.On deck we liked the mainsheet/traveler system and the good visibility over the coachroof from the

Maiden Hong Kong

by Sail Staff, Posted May 31, 2005
Mari-Cha IV currently rules the Atlantic, but there may be a new sheriff in town with the launching of Frank Pong's record chaser, Maiden Hong Kong. Designer Juan Kouyoumdjian's brief was for a 100-foot-plus monohull capable of breaking existing transoceanic records. Maiden's 115-foot carbon-composite hull is a stripped-out (pipe berths only) racer built by DK Yachts in

Baraka

by Sail Staff, Posted August 7, 2008
A happy combination, with everything rightIf you want a yacht that can give you the ride of your life during the day and provide hotel-style accommodations at anchor, Jean de Fontenay’s Reichel Pugh designed 62-foot sloop, Baraka, takes the brass ring in both categories. Fontenay, a sailor with impressive credentials, thrives on the challenges that come with sailing a
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