Boat Reviews

Delphia 47

by Sail Staff, Posted August 3, 2010
Poland has a long boatbuilding tradition, and Delphia Yachts is its premier sailboat builder. The new 47 is a fast cruiser with a self-tacking jib and bright, welcoming accommodations. There is a choice of three or five sleeping cabins.For more information, click here. SPECS:LOA: 46.2ft

Spirit 46

by Sail Staff, Posted August 10, 2010
This stunning boat is a "masterpiece of contemporary wooden yacht construction" according to her builders, and who am I to disagree? Her sleek lines hark back to the meter boats of yesteryear, and she has been designed and built purely for sailing pleasure. The good looks are backed up by simple but elegant accommodations.SPECS: LOA: 46ft 3in LWL: 33ft 10in

Shoal Survivor

by Sail Staff, Posted May 5, 2011
There was a time when the variable-draft sailboat was a common sight along North America’s coastlines. Tartan, Pearson, Morgan, C&C, Sabre, Hunter and other builders all offered largish cruising boats with centerboards or swing keels, and many of those now-elderly vessels still populate the thin waters of the Carolinas, Chesapeake and Florida.Changes to racing rules in the 1970s made

Cookson 50

by Sail Staff, Posted May 31, 2005
The Cookson 50 from New Zealand's Cookson Boats belongs to the new generation of high-performance boats sporting canting keels and blistering speed potential. Mick Cookson, who worked with Farr Yacht Design to develop the concept, didn't start out to build a canting-keeler. "This began as a fixed-keel boat with a trim tab," he said. But Cookson also wanted a lightning-fast boat that had enough

J/109

by Sail Staff, Posted February 4, 2003
The J/109 is more than a high-performance boat with cruiser-friendly add-ons; it's a well-conceived, well-executed dual-purpose boat that comes close to being all things to all sailors. Fast, easy to handle, stable, and spacious, the J/109 can serve as a competitive racer, comfortable cruiser, shorthanded daysailer, and a family weekender.The accommodations plan includes a proper nav

Eleuthera 60

by Sail Staff, Posted July 12, 2005
This flagship of the Fountaine-Pajot fleet made its U.S. debut at the Strictly Sail Show in Miami, Florida, last February. The 60-footer reflects the builder's decade of experience building its 56-foot Marquises design, with its well-proportioned sailplan and well-apportioned interior spaces. This new model has slightly wider hulls than the 56-footer, which has created more

Anna

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Launched in June at the Brooklin Boat Yard, Brooklin, Maine, this 56-foot classic with a modern underbody borrows heavily from Stormy Weather, one of S&S’s most famous designs, which dates to the mid-1930s. With a few exceptions the yacht is a scaled-up version of Stormy, but, says S&S president and chief naval architect Greg Matzat, while most aesthetic elements from the older boat—sheer
Multihulls have been around for a long time. The Chinese reportedly sailed double-hulled junks as early as 2700 BC, and ancient Polynesians used a variety of multi-hulled craft to colonize the South Pacific. The Englishman William Dampier was the first Westerner on record to use the word “catamaran” back in the 1690s during a trip through the Tamil region in Southern India. The word itself comes

FastCat 305 Vector-K

by Sail Staff, Posted February 25, 2005
Who says cruising catamarans must be over 40 feet long to have accommodations? The FastCat 305 Vector-K is one of several new cruising catamarans that are now being imported by African Cats US. It's only 30 feet long, but its 18-foot beam frees up sufficient interior space to house three cabins and a comfortable six-seater saloon with wrap-around exterior views. Freeboard is

Friendship 53

by Sail Staff, Posted January 16, 2006
When a client wanted to replicate the exact look and idea of the Friendship 40, but in a slightly larger version with two staterooms instead of one, designer Ted Fontaine began to draw—and a big sister to the Friendship 40 was born. The exteriors of the two boats are nearly identical, with clean decks and low-profile cabintops providing a full 360-degree line of sight for the helmsman. The 53’s
  • facebook
  • twitter