Boat Reviews

Lagoon 52

by Tom Dove, Posted June 9, 2014
Looks can be deceiving aboard this innovative cat
At the last Annapolis boat show everyone was talking about Beneteau’s new multi-personality performance cruiser, the interior of which can be changed so much it defies the limits of what can be considered a production boat. This model doesn’t just evolve from previous concepts, it leaps off the drawing board and challenges you to imagine its perfect use.  

The Hanse 445

by Adam Cort, Posted November 10, 2011
This is a boat that violates nearly every traditional aesthetic value you can imagine. Yet somehow, the Judel/Vrolijk design office has managed to blend these elements into a yacht that is powerful looking and uniquely elegant.
Adapted from a successful youth match-racing design, every feature of the Andrews 21 is keyed toward teaching and training. I sailed the boat in a mild breeze in Newport Harbor, California, its native waters, and it delivered what I expected. The boat was lively, but tractable, and comfortable in every way, whether it be from an emotional perspective—she looks contemporary and aggressive—to physically finding my place in the cockpit.

Pittman 90

by Craig Davis, Posted January 23, 2006
Over the last decade or so, the America’s Cup and Maxi-yacht classes have benefited from most of the research money going into sailing. Today’s Maxi owners aren’t shy about pushing design far beyond what is permitted in the America’s Cup. Maxis are larger than the Cup yachts and increasingly use canting keels and water ballast to improve performance. Reichel/Pugh, German Frers,

Le Breton SIG45

by Dave Baldwin, Posted March 3, 2006
You have to admire Hugo Le Breton for setting the bar high with his new SIG 45. His goal was simple and ambitious: to combine the high-performance design elements of an ocean-racing multihull with the style of a contemporary cruising monohull. The result is a 45-foot racer-cruiser that comfortably accommodates six and can hit top speeds of over 20 knots. The SIG 45 features

Raider 30

by Charles J. Doane, Posted August 25, 2004
The recent proliferation of large cruising catamarans has been well documented, but there is also an increasing number of smaller performance catamarans that offer modest living accommodations for go-fast racer/cruiser types. One of the most interesting of these is the Raider 30, a very sleek craft that was born four years ago in Australia and debuted in the U.S. early last year. There

Telstar 28

by Bill Springer, Posted July 14, 2004
When a fire destroyed the molds for the Telstar trimarans in 1981, Performance Cruising founder and designer Tony Smith rebuilt his factory and started production of the Gemini catamarans. Gemini's success pushed the Telstars to the back of, but not completely off, the drawing board. After years spent redesigning, re-engineering, and rigorously testing five full-size prototypes, Smith has

Andrews 45

by Peter Nielsen, Posted September 21, 2006
West Coaster Alan Andrews has drawn a long line of fast racing sleds, and with this 45-footer he shows that he can turn his mind to cruising too—fast cruising, that is. The Andrews 45 has pretty though reasonably conventional above-waterline looks, but a peek below the bootstripe reveals a stilettolike spade rudder and deep T-keel that obviously mean business. With just 12 feet, 7 inches of beam,

Briand 78

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Whimsy, designed by naval architect Philippe Briand, was launched by Vaudrey Miller Yachts late last summer. The owner, an experienced racing yachtsman who formerly managed a major British design agency, was deeply involved in the project, whose guiding principle was “less is more.” The end result is a very contemporary cruising yacht, which has a modern hull shape,
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