Boat Reviews

Lagoon 52

by Tom Dove, Posted June 9, 2014
Looks can be deceiving aboard this innovative cat
At the last Annapolis boat show everyone was talking about Beneteau’s new multi-personality performance cruiser, the interior of which can be changed so much it defies the limits of what can be considered a production boat. This model doesn’t just evolve from previous concepts, it leaps off the drawing board and challenges you to imagine its perfect use.  
Adapted from a successful youth match-racing design, every feature of the Andrews 21 is keyed toward teaching and training. I sailed the boat in a mild breeze in Newport Harbor, California, its native waters, and it delivered what I expected. The boat was lively, but tractable, and comfortable in every way, whether it be from an emotional perspective—she looks contemporary and aggressive—to physically finding my place in the cockpit.

The Hanse 445

by Adam Cort, Posted November 10, 2011
This is a boat that violates nearly every traditional aesthetic value you can imagine. Yet somehow, the Judel/Vrolijk design office has managed to blend these elements into a yacht that is powerful looking and uniquely elegant.

Bruckmann Daysailer 42

by Sail Staff, Posted August 10, 2005
Measuring in at over 42 feet long and displacing more than 17,000 pounds, the Bruckmann Daysailer is designed to be an easy-to-sail head-turner with graceful lines and long overhangs that’s equally at home on a harbor cruise or a weekend getaway. The final product seems to be up to the task. The light, stiff hull is a composite of Corecell, E-glass, and vinylester resin. The decks are

X-35

by Sail Staff, Posted May 3, 2005
Danish builder X-Yachts is set to debut its new X-35 One Design later this year, but don’t be fooled by the "One Design" label. It's more than just a 35-foot one-design racer. Like lots of new launches these days, it's designed to be sporty, easy to sail, and comfortable belowdecks.Strict one-design rules have been established to foster fleet development for those who want to race, but the

Precision_23

by Sail Staff, Posted September 23, 2004
Not all pocket cruisers are water-ballasted. The Jim Taylor-designed Precision 23 achieves stability with fixed ballast and a shallow keel/centerboard configuration. With the board up the minimum draft is just under 2 feet; draft increases to 5 feet, 4 inches with the board down. The Precision also bucks pocket-cruiser convention in that it has a conventional cabin-top and legitimate side decks.

Sunreef 60

by Sail Staff, Posted January 18, 2006
After completing a 74-foot catamaran intended principally for luxury charters, designers Van Peteghem and Prevost were asked by Sunreef to design a smaller catamaran that would appeal to private owners. With four units—two in aluminum and two in composite laminates— already under construction at the builder’s yard in Gdansk, Poland, there is little doubt that this concept has struck a responsive

Hunter 49

by Bill Springer, Posted September 5, 2006
A 49-foot cruiser with lots of bells and whistlesBy Bill SpringerHead designer Glenn Henderson has redesigned the entire Hunter line since he arrived in 1998, and now, starting with the new Hunter 49, he’s in the process of refining his redesigns. I jumped aboard hull #1 with Hunter’s chief tester, Steve Pettingill, on a 180-mile passage from St. Augustine,

Southerly 46RS

by Sail Staff, Posted September 29, 2006
Northshore Yachts has led the way in developing swing-keel designs that sail well in all conditions. Their newest and largest model is this new 46-footer designed by Jason Ker in conjunction with the Northshore design team. The yacht’s key feature is a cast-iron grounding plate that ties into a web of frames and longitudinal stringers to create a strong and light structure that supports the keel.
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