Boats

Tartan 4000 Page 2

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Under Sail

It was looking pretty grim as we cast off lines at the McMichael boatyard in Mamaroneck, New York—sunny and warm, but dead calm. Fortunately, motoring out onto Long Island Sound we soon discovered a gentle sea breeze, which prompted us to hoist the full-batten main and unfurl the 155 percent genoa. In no time we were gliding along at 4.5 knots in just over 6 knots of apparent wind. Chasing catspaws, we found a nice little puff, and the boat immediately accelerated to 5 knots in 8.5 knots apparent.

I was sitting behind one of the twin wheels when it occurred to me I couldn’t remember when I’d last touched the helm. Perfectly balanced, the Tartan was more than happy to sail itself while the rest of us did whatever it was that we had to do.

Later, heading back in, we rolled up the genoa, unfurled the self-tacking blade jib on the inner forestay and short-tacked up the channel into Mamaroneck. Once again the 4000 responded wonderfully, coming about decisively and quickly getting back up to speed on each new tack.

When it came time to lower the main, all we did was shoot up into the wind and let go the halyard. The sail came sliding down effortlessly on its Harken Battcar system while the single-line lazy jack system and wide “pocket boom” gathered the sail with ease. For years, Tartan has worked to perfect what it calls its “Cruise Control Rig,” which both performs well and is easy to manage. Granted, the reacher tends to get hung up on the inner forestay when gybing, but that’s a small price to pay for the rig’s inherent flexibility.

Under Power

A bow thruster is an option, but it is definitely a convenience rather than a necessity. With its deep balanced spade rudder and a folding prop on a saildrive unit, the boat maneuvered well in all directions at low speeds and powered up nicely as we motored out to the Sound. The test boat was equipped with an optional 75hp “turbo” engine and a folding four-blade prop, which pushed us along at 6.5 knots at 2,000 rpm. (A 55hp Volvo engine and a three-blade folding prop are standard.) Throttling up to 2,800 rpm yielded 8.3 knots of boat speed. Top speed at 3,2000 rpm was 9.2 knots.

Conclusion

The Tartan 4000 may look like a “traditional” design, but don’t be a fooled simply because it isn’t chasing the latest design fads. It is, in fact, a very modern boat that incorporates much of what is best from across the design and boatbuilding world. The result is a fine yacht that is a pleasure to be aboard, no matter what kind of sailing you do.

Specifications:

HEADROOM 6ft 5in

BERTHS 6ft 6in x 5ft 4in (fwd); 6ft 6in x 4ft 8in (aft)

LOA 40ft 8in

LWL 36ft 5in

BEAM 13ft

DRAFT 7ft 6in (deep keel); 5ft 11in (shoal) 4ft 9in (centerboard up)

DISPLACEMENT 19,604lb (deep keel) 20,104lb (shoal); 21,104lb (centerboard)

BALLAST 6,400lb (deep keel); 8,000lb (shoal); 8,600lb (centerboard)

SAIL AREA 890ft2 (main and self-tacking jib)

FUEL/WATER/WASTE (GAL) 50/100/20

ENGINE 55hp Volvo saildrive

ELECTRICAL 90AH (engine); 2 x 220AH (house)

DESIGNER Tim Jackett

BUILDER Tartan Yachts, Painesville, OH, 440-357-7777, tartanyachts.com

PRICE $450,000 (sailaway)

Ballast Ratio: 33

Sail Area-Displacement Ratio: 20

Displacement-Length Ratio: 181

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