Boats

Southerly 42RST

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Paul and Cheryl Shard, the relatively new owners of the Southerly 42RST I took for a test sail on Chesapeake Bay off Annapolis, Maryland, have been live-aboard cruisers (and sailing filmmakers as well) for over 15 years. They logged thousands of offshore miles on their previous boat, and when it came time for a new boat, they chose the Southerly 42RST (stands for raised saloon, twin wheels). I soon found out why.

Construction

Northshore Yachts builds the 42RST using its patented "Nordseal" three-layer laminating system, which is designed to protect the hull from osmosis. The Nordseal system replaces conventional gelcoat below the waterline by laying up the hull in three osmosis-retardant layers. The hull and decks are built of solid hand-laid-up fiberglass using this system. Structural bulkheads are bonded into the hull to ensure optimum strength and rigidity.

On deck

At first glance, the 42RST appears fairly conventional. Dual helms facilitate easy walk-through access from the stern. The cockpit is both secure (deep with excellent bracing points) and comfortable with its nearly 6-foot-long seats and tall, angled seatbacks. Lifeline stanchions are sufficiently tall and sturdy. The side decks are narrow, but not so narrow as to make going forward difficult. The coachroof-mounted traveler keeps the cockpit relatively clutter free. The anchor locker is large, and the beefy ground-tackle system should meet the needs of any cruisers.

Things are a little less conventional (for a medium-displacement offshore cruiser) below the waterline. The dual helms control dual semi-balanced rudders, and the draft of the 3,400 pound keel can be hydraulically adjusted from 2 feet, 9 inches to 8 feet, 11 inches with a touch of a button at the helm.

Accommodations

Northshore's designers did a excellent job of hiding the keel trunk in the furniture that forms the saloon's inner edge. The saloon, to port at the base of the companionway steps, is comfortable, provides an excellent sea berth, and affords both light and 270-degree visibility. The nav station also benefits from the visibility of being "up" on the saloon level -- "up" in that the galley is forward and a couple of steps down from the saloon. There are good handholds and brace points, but you will need to remember the steps. Down in the galley you'll find excellent stowage, good counter space, and an opening hatch over the stove for ventilation. The master cabin is two steps down and aft from the saloon. It has a genuine walk-around bunk, drawers and lockers that will swallow lots of stuff, and a private (accessible only from the cabin) head with a roomy shower stall. The guest cabin forward is slightly smaller, but it, too, should be plenty comfortable, and there's a second head close by.

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