Racing

Olympic sailing launched on a low note—the 1896 races in Greece were cancelled for lack of wind—but there have been many high points since. Olympic sailors have created a wonderful legacy. By way of example, we tip our hats to the great ...

Paul Elvström for the longest Olympic "moment" ever. It's been a show to watch, from the gritty determination that led him to


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A handicapper speaks

by Sail Staff, Posted June 4, 2004
By Bruce Bingman, Technical Chair for PHRF on the Chesapeake

I think the real issue is what kind of racing do sailors want. The problem is that different sailors want different kinds and different levels of racing, but usually there are not enough boats in any one group to be able to offer a specific class and/or start.

The USSAILING website offers information on "golf


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The Zaraffa Transatlantic Journal

by , Posted June 22, 2003
SAIL's deputy editor Josh Adams crewed aboard the 66-foot Zaraffa in the DaimlerChrysler North Atlantic Challenge, 3,600 miles from Newport, Rhode Island to Cuxhaven, Germany. Designed by Richel/Pugh and owned by Skip Sheldon of Shelburne, Vermont, Zaraffa went into this race as a favorite (she was the overall winner of the 2002 Newport-Bermuda) and was first to finish by a large
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Pirate Reborn

by Kimball Livingston, Posted April 14, 2003
In the early 20th century, R-boat racing attracted the brightest and the best. R's were large enough to be yachts and small enough to be toys.

One of the most historic of the lot, Pirate, R11, is being restored in Seattle at the lively Center for Wooden Boats. Pirate was the first West Coast boat to campaign on the East Coast—she won the 1929 nationals at


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