Boat Reviews

Perini 289

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Perini Navi and Yildiz Gemi, the company’s Turkish facility, launched this three-masted ship, the largest sailing yacht in the world, in March 2006. The 289-foot vessel was built in steel and was launched from a drydock moored in the bay of Tuzla.

When fully rigged, the yacht will have three rotating masts and will set nearly 26,000 square feet of sail. The rig and sail controls are managed


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Boat Reviews

Dubois 130

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Designed by Dubois Naval Architects, this 130-foot aluminum sloop was built for an experienced American owner, who was planning to buy a large motoryacht until he saw another Dubois design similar to this one in Auckland. Janice, like many Dubois designs, has a low profile and spacious accommodations for owner and crew, but this design, says Dubois, has an even lower superstructure than
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Boat Reviews

Sunreef 122

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Sunreef Yachts has built many catamarans in the 60-foot range but is now moving into larger yachts, many of them custom projects. One example is this 122-foot aluminum yacht, which will sail with a crew of six. The crew is housed in the forward sections of the port hull, and a full-service galley for the entire ship’s company, along with the crew’s dining area, is located in the after section of
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Boat Reviews

Tripp 76 Cafe Racer

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Baltic Yachts has started work on this lifting-keel sloop from the board of Tripp Design. Carbon construction and composite rigging will keep its weight down and allows for the installation of a luxurious Dick Young–designed interior.

A caf racer is a cruising yacht whose sailing characteristics approach those of a racer, but whose modern aesthetics are a source of pride to an owner when


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Cruising

Cruising Tips - Pilotage

by Sail Staff, Posted September 26, 2006
Beware of the Buoys (August 2006)

“Just head for the buoy up ahead, and make sure you leave it to starboard.” An instruction like this is asking for trouble, especially if a novice is steering. All it takes is a bit of cross current and the boat will be gradually set off course, all the while pointing faithfully at the buoy; it may even be set onto the very hazard the buoy is marking.


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Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing’s Adil Khalid on his Second VOR

Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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