Boat Reviews

J/92

by Bill Springer, Posted August 22, 2006
Ever since Rod Johnstone built Ragtime, which ended up being the J/24 prototype in 1974, J Boats has produced boats that are fun to race as well as comfortable and manageable enough for family cruising. The new 30-foot J/92s fits that design brief perfectly. The J/92 has been very successful on racecourses in Europe and the U.S., and the J/92s is intended to be a more stable,
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Boat Reviews

Nautitech 40

by Bill Springer, Posted August 22, 2006
At first glance the Nautitech 40 seems to have solved the conundrum all large cruising-cat designers face—how to draw a boat that’s spacious on the inside and sleek and sexy on the outside. Nautitech’s answer is to unify the topsides by seamlessly blending the coachroof into the hard cockpit roof. As with all designs, a compromise was required. Instead of having a single helm station on the back
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Boat Reviews

Transit 380

by Bill Springer, Posted August 22, 2006
It’s easy to see why the Optimist is the boat of choice for the youngest sailors, but what’s not so clear is where those still-young sailors go when they’ve outgrown the Opti. Designer Jim Taylor and Precision Boatworks have addressed the need for a transition boat between the Opti and larger, more powerful boats like the Laser or the 420 with the new Transit 380. It’s a stable
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Cruising

Cruising Grounds

by Sail Staff, Posted August 11, 2006
20 MILES AROUND... San Francisco, California

San Francisco may be the “most European” American city, but San Francisco Bay and the views of whitecaps beyond the cable-car lines make this more than just a California placename. The ocean beyond the Golden Gate is challenging. Within the shelter of the bay is sailing adventure enough, with its typical brisk and chilly sea breeze and


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Gear and Reviews

New Gear - July 2006

by Sail Staff, Posted August 10, 2006
Fear No FireThe one thing you shouldn’t do with a fire in an enclosed space—like an engine bay on a boat—is to add more air. Smell something burning, open the engine compartment, and whoosh, say goodbye to your eyebrows, and maybe to your boat. That’s why I like this simple install-it-yourself Fire Port ($8.74). If you ever see flames through the transparent window, just puncture
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Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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