Boat Reviews

J/65

by Kimball Livingston, Posted September 28, 2006

In the business world, planners often wonder whether a given model will “scale.” In the sailing world that’s not critical, but it’s interesting when it happens, and rarely has a design concept been carried as far as J Boats has gone with its new J/65. Two are in the water now, in the hands of experienced owners. While the interior spaces and systems were customized for each owner, the


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Boat Reviews

Waterwitch 48

by Charles Mason, Posted September 28, 2006
As president of the New York Jets football team, Jay Cross puts in his share of long hours. When it’s time to decompress, chances are he’ll be found out on the water. That’s nothing new. As a young sailor, Cross competed in 470 dinghies at the Olympic level and also designed and raced International 14s; in the early ‘80s his Cross III design was a world standard for the class. But his subsequent
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Boat Reviews

Perini 289

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Perini Navi and Yildiz Gemi, the company’s Turkish facility, launched this three-masted ship, the largest sailing yacht in the world, in March 2006. The 289-foot vessel was built in steel and was launched from a drydock moored in the bay of Tuzla.

When fully rigged, the yacht will have three rotating masts and will set nearly 26,000 square feet of sail. The rig and sail controls are managed


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Boat Reviews

Dubois 130

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Designed by Dubois Naval Architects, this 130-foot aluminum sloop was built for an experienced American owner, who was planning to buy a large motoryacht until he saw another Dubois design similar to this one in Auckland. Janice, like many Dubois designs, has a low profile and spacious accommodations for owner and crew, but this design, says Dubois, has an even lower superstructure than
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Boat Reviews

Sunreef 122

by Sail Staff, Posted September 28, 2006
Sunreef Yachts has built many catamarans in the 60-foot range but is now moving into larger yachts, many of them custom projects. One example is this 122-foot aluminum yacht, which will sail with a crew of six. The crew is housed in the forward sections of the port hull, and a full-service galley for the entire ship’s company, along with the crew’s dining area, is located in the after section of
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SAIL Magazine and the Boston Sailing Center come together to teach the rolling hitch, an essential sailing knot that is most often used to release an override on a winch

Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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