Boat Reviews

Hood 55 Expedition

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Ted Hood has been designing seagoing yachts for over 50 years; his latest is an all-round ocean voyager. It’s designed with a tall rig for running before trade winds, and there’s also a big diesel to get to windward when time is short and the winds are from the wrong quarter. There’s comfortable seating behind either of the dual wheel stations, with good visibility in all directions. A remote
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Boat Reviews

102-Foot Sloop

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008

Monty North has started work on this sloop for a client who built a 78-foot ketch at the yard many years ago. The yacht’s overall length is the smallest that can accommodate the fly bridge and superstructure the owner wanted and do so without disturbing the sailing performance and looks of the classic hull form.

Designers worked for more than a year on the fly bridge concept. The


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Boat Reviews

Oyster 525

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
Yet another new Oyster is under way, and as usual the design emphasis is a balanced combination of performance, comfort, and solid construction.

Designer Rob Humphreys has given the new yacht a larger cockpit than other designs in the size range. And like all Oysters, it is ergonomically designed for comfort.

Belowdeck accommodations include a spacious saloon, three guest cabins, and an


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Boat Reviews

Wauquiez Pilot Saloon 55

by Sail Staff, Posted August 8, 2008
The largest design to date in the venerable Wauquiez line of seagoing craft is moving toward a launch date expected at the end of the year. A main feature of the design is the arch that supports the mainsheet, bimini, cockpit speakers, and lights. The yacht’s primary winches are electric and can be controlled from either of the dual steering stations. Both the main and genoa sheets are led aft
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Boat Reviews

Oyster 655

by Sail Staff, Posted August 7, 2008

The Oyster 655 is the latest model in Oyster’s new g5 series of Kevlar/carbon deck-saloon cruisers. The hull lines were created and drawn by naval architect Rob Humphreys and Oyster’s own experienced in-house design team, with engineering assistance from the composite engineering company High Modulus. As a result, the 655’s single-skin hull has an E-glass/carbon/Kevlar composite laminate that


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SAIL Magazine and the Boston Sailing Center come together to teach the rolling hitch, an essential sailing knot that is most often used to release an override on a winch

Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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