Charter

Charter Insurance

by Amy Ullrich, Posted August 7, 2008

As Sunsail’s Peter Cook says, “You never know what will happen on a boat.” Enter charter insurance, which is designed to cover you in case of a serious event—major loss or damage.

In the well-established charter world of the Caribbean, the pattern is industry wide, though the actual amounts differ by company; the variables are the size and age of the boat and the location of the charter.


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Boat Reviews

Spirit 56

by Malcolm White, Posted August 7, 2008

When you look at the classic mahogany brightwork, teak decks, and fine ends of a Spirit-built yacht, you are to be forgiven if you suspect it dates from the early twentieth century. Then you notice the rod rigging, the carbon-fiber spars, and the foil keel and lead bulb under a cedar-stripped hull—all part of the latest technology. This is how today’s builders blend the above-water


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Boat Reviews

Pacific Seacraft 38

by Sail Staff, Posted August 7, 2008
Pacific Seacraft has new management, is also building and marketing Saga Yachts, and has announced the launch of a new boat of its own. This is slated to be a highly stable medium-displacement cruiser with a traditional cutter rig. But instead of producing another Bill Crealock design, this time the company tapped Bob Perry to come up with a brand-new boat with all the features Pacific Seacrafts
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Expert Advice

One-Way Street

by Amy Ullrich, Posted August 7, 2008

I was recently confronted with the not-unpleasant conundrum of how to make the best use of a one-week charter in a place (a) I’d never sailed before, (b) I am unlikely to return to, and (c) that is too big to sail and see it all in a week. What I consider to be “best use” involves a pleasant amount of sailing (but not dawn to dusk) and a reasonable amount of time to see the sights ashore and


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Boat Reviews

Maestro 40

by Herb McCormick, Posted August 7, 2008

If you strolled the docks at the major East Coast sailboat shows last fall and thought you were seeing a higher-than-average number of good-looking new designs from Scandinavian builders, you were. Among the ranks of that swelling Nordic fleet was a mid-size performance cruiser called the Maestro 40, created by one of the true deans of Northern European naval architects, Eivind Still. The


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Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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