Boatworks

Ready for Sea

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2008
Simply hoping that your rig is trouble free is not a good strategy, says Chris Lab

You need to keep up to date on the condition of your standing and running rigging, both before you launch in the spring and continually throughout the season. Your rig is an integrated system, and anything that happens to any part of it can quickly turn your sailboat into a slow-moving


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Boatworks

Geezer Think Smart

by Chip Lawson, Posted August 25, 2008

Making sailboats easier to handle (“Sailing for Geezers,” September 2007) apparently touched a responsive chord. Here are more improvements I’ve made on my 30-year-old Pearson 40 to make it easier and safer for me to handle. Since I’m approaching 60 years of age, easier also equals fun.

The Geezer mainsail reefStaying in the cockpit when the wind is building is a


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Cruising

Serious Essentials

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2008
Our new boat came with plastic seacocks, and when I closed one of the small ones, the handle broke off along with part of the tapered plug, leaving an open hole in the hull. I immediately pushed the broken piece back in place to reduce water flow, but it was still coming in faster than the bilgepump could handle. I needed a quick remedy.

I keep a can of Plumber's Putty in my toolbox. I


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Cruising

Simple Shower

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2008
We knew when we moved aboard our 34-foot cutter, Eurisko, and became full-time cruisers that the boat didn't have a shower. We also knew that using a solar shower on deck wouldn't work for us on a day-to-day basis. We knew, too, that we couldn't afford to stop at a marina every few days.

Our solution was to modify a 21/2-gallon pressurized garden sprayer by attaching a spray nozzle


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Cruising

Fewer Fouled Sheets

by Sail Staff, Posted August 25, 2008
Fewer Fouled SheetsIf there is a topping-lift bridle on your spinnaker pole, there's a good chance—depending on how the spinnaker-pole uphaul is rigged—that the bridle could foul either the jib or spinnaker sheet. This happens often enough that foredeck crews on many raceboats—especially in one-design fleets—have changed their pole lifts to minimize the chance of fouling. Here's how
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Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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