Cruising

Eliminating Winch Overrides

by Sail Staff, Posted August 22, 2008
Many boatowners, racers and cruisers alike, have upgraded their genoa cars so they can be adjusted while under load. These systems are great for achieving proper sail trim, but sometimes the genoa cars end up high enough above the deck that the sheet lead to the winch drum is on a downward slope. This creates an inherent tendency for the sheet to override itself on the winch.

To avoid


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Cruising

Staying Clean and Green

by Sail Staff, Posted August 22, 2008
Start using cleaning products that don’t damage the environment or your pocketbookBy Bob Tigar

Some “marine” cleaning products are specifically designed for marine use, but most are repackaged household products that are sold at significantly higher prices. When we kept our Morgan Out Island 33, Diversion, on Lake Michigan, cleaning and maintaining the boat wasn’t


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Boatworks

Adding Mast Pulpits

by Peter Dubler, Posted August 21, 2008

Call me old-fashioned, call me daring, call me crazy, but I prefer not to have my cockpit full of lines that have been led aft. I enjoy going forward and working at the mast. It hasn’t always been that way. During my first crossing from Isla Mujeres, Mexico, to the Dry Tortugas off Florida many years ago as crew on an Irwin 38, each trip forward was a crawl on my hands and knees. Oh, how I


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Destinations

Deja Vu All Over Again

by Amy Ullrich, Posted August 21, 2008

Echoes of a long-ago family charter reverberate in a Florida charter with grandchildren. Maybe it's genetic.

 

 

It was a long time ago—in our family's history and in the history of chartering boats—when my husband, George, feeling in immediate need of a vacation one August, chartered the only boat available in the state of Maine. It was our first time


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Boatworks

Easy Reefing

by Ian Nicholson, Posted August 21, 2008

Windage and drag are two of a racing sailboat’s worst enemies, especially around a sail’s leech. Many racers eschew in situ reefing lines until it’s absolutely necessary to reef. (Some cruisers also don’t use reefing lines, as they can chafe sailcloth.) The risk is that you can get caught out if you’re not careful.

A smarter, faster way to reef without leaving reefing lines in


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Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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