Boatworks

Galley Upgrades

by Sail Staff, Posted August 28, 2008
Thinking hard about the little things increases efficiencyBy Rob Lucey

Most production galleys are fine for a weekend cruise, but if you’re thinking about a longer time frame for the galley’s use—extended cruising or living aboard—any shortcomings will quickly become apparent. Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for what you are given. For example, my wife and I


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Boatworks

Higher and Faster

by Kevin Montague, Posted August 28, 2008

Recently, a sailmaker called to inquire about upgrading the backstay system on his client’s mid-1980s 34-foot masthead-rigged sloop. The client was buying a slightly larger headsail that could cover a broader spectrum of wind ranges and thought that the standard backstay and turnbuckle just weren’t up to the task. The working range of the turnbuckle was 2 to 3 inches of length, and the time


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Cruising

Datum Shift

by Sail Staff, Posted August 28, 2008
Here’s a chartplotter photo that shows the boat plunked into the local parking lot. In fact, it was tied alongside the pier northwest of number 4. The distance to the apparent position was over 200 yards. The fault lay in a discrepancy between the GPS lat-long data and the electronic chart itself. In other words, it’s a classic datum shift. Think about what could have happened to the boat
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Cruising

Reef Untangler

by Sail Staff, Posted August 28, 2008
We love our slab-reefing setup but constantly had problems with the reefing lines getting tangled up around the end of the boom. The solution was simple. We always carry a couple of spare battens inside the boom, and we discovered that leaving one poking out prevents this from happening. Kitty van
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Cruising

River Anchorage

by Sail Staff, Posted August 28, 2008
When anchoring in a river, take note of the prevailing and forecast wind directions. Will the wind at any time oppose the current (A)? If it does, the boat will not lie well to its anchor. It may even sail around enough to pluck the hook out of the bottom. If at all possible, choose a section of the river where the prevailing wind is blowing across the current (B). The boat will tend to lie with
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Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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