Boatworks

Quiet Connector

by Sail Staff, Posted December 9, 2008
My wife, Gail, and I recently installed a new radar antenna on the keel-stepped mast of our Bristol 38.8. The first part of the installation was easy. We mounted the receiver and then, using a weighted string as a messenger, pulled the cables through a small hole in the mast near the unit all the way down to the bottom, The difficult part—figuring out a way to keep the cables from slapping
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Boatworks

Gravity Theory

by Peter Nielsen, Posted December 9, 2008
Smell. Pong. Effluvium. Whichever way you describe it, the airborne essence emanating from Ostara’s aged sanitation system was highly unpleasant. More than just an odor but thankfully short of a full-blown stench, it permeated the forepeak and almost caused a spousal mutiny during our first weekend aboard. No doubt about it – something had to be done.

The sanitation system comprised a


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SAIL's founding editor passes away

by Charles Mason, Posted December 9, 2008
The founding editor of SAIL Magazine has died after a long illness. Murray Davis, an Australian by birth, arrived in America not by plane or by ocean liner but rather on a 45-foot ketch named Klang that he, his wife Barbara and their two young children had sailed from England.

A consummate journalist, Davis always had with him a Rolodex stuffed with the names of many of the


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The British speed sailing boat Sailrocket has set a new world record, before self-destructing in spectacular fashion.

Helmed by Australian Paul Larsen, the lightweight flier hit peak speeds of 52 knots in only 22 knots of wind and averaged 47.36 knots over the 500 meter course to set a new Class B speed record.

On its next run, the boat came unstuck at 50 knots-plus and was


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Boatworks

Alternative Rigs

by David Schmidt, Posted December 8, 2008
Sailors are a conservative lot. The sea takes no prisoners, and most people don’t care to experiment when the cost of failure is potentially great. That’s why both futuristic and some older traditional sailing rigs struggle for acceptance and often receive little more than patronizing smiles from so-called modern mariners.

Ironically, the conventional marconi rig that now dominates sailing


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Facnor's flat deck furler on a J/111

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